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ATHENews - October 4, 2011 - Volume 25, Number 3 - Focus Group Calls for Papers
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Calls for Papers

Association for Asian Performance

Fully engaged in research internationally, Asian Performance scholars are global advocates. Not only can we use this conference theme to examine performance as/is civic engagement on a regional level, but we can explore where that engagement crosses regional, national and international boundaries. (Panels might address theatrical movements, specialties, historical moments, key individuals, etc.) The AAP welcomes all panels and papers that address broad intersections of the theme and all genres of Asian performance. investigations of specific modern, contemporary and/or traditional performances and genres, as well as intercultural, cross-cultural and diasporic topics are welcome. We also welcome all types of historical, theoretical, performative and dramatic/literary analysis. Topics of interest might include, but are not limited to:

  • Gender - Past, Present, and Future
  • The Asian Diaspora and its tehatre / Theatre and the Asian Diaspora
  • Religion
  • (Re-)theorization of a particular genre
  • "Intercultural" collaborations or explorations
  • Topics on a particular genre or trends
  • Topics of historical interest
  • Workshops - especially those that include a pedagogical focus.

Submit individual papers to conference planner John D. Swain (shibaiman@mac.com) by October 15 to be possibly matched with others to compose a complete panel. If you submit a complete session, please forward a separate copy to Mr. Swain.


American Theatre and Drama Society

ATDS @ 25: Looking Forward, Looking Back
To celebrate its 25th anniversary, the American Theatre and Drama Society plans to present a set of coordinated panels, designed to chart the chronological, topical, and historiographic progression of our discipline.

Four panels have been created by ATDS and feature a chair/respondent who will issue a call for papers. Keep an eye out for CFPs on the following topics:

  1. The Long Nineteenth Century
  2. American Popular Entertainments
  3. Twentieth Century American Theatre and Drama
  4. American Theatre in the Twenty-First Century

ATDS plans to put forward three multi-disciplinary calls for papers on the following topics:

  1. The American Musical
  2. African American Theatre and Drama
  3. Latino/Latina American Theatre and Performance

ATDS will also program one additional panel on the state of the profession, to be offered at the end of the conference as a response to all previous sessions.
ATDS welcomes additional panels or individual papers that address key loci in American Theatre and Drama from all ATHE members. (Panels might address theatrical movements, specialties, historical moments, key individuals, etc.)
Multi-disciplinary panels addressing key movements, genres, or moments in American Theatre history are also encouraged.

Submit individual papers to conference planner Susan Kattwinkel (kattwinkels@cofc.edu) by October 15 to be possibly matched with others to compose a complete panel. If you submit a complete session, please forward a separate copy to Ms. Kattwinkel.


Design and Technology

With two hours available in Chicago, through the scheduling of two Design and Technology Focus Group meetings by Ellen Jones, members had sufficient time to develop a laundry list of possible session topics and discussion ideas. Though not an exhaustive list, what follows are just a few of the possible topics to consider:

  • Post production discussions: a kinder, gentler postmortem;
  • Powers and pitfalls of projection design;
  • DC at night the evolving technology of architectural lighting;
  • Hands on Kabuki, the costume, the make-up, the how;
  • Museum specialist and other non-traditional career paths for the theatre designer;
  • Collaboration engineer: there’s an app for that;
  • Civic engagement - service to community;
  • Narrative design and the narrative of bias;
  • Color and lighting - cultural implication spatial composition;
  • Impact of budget on programs: preservation and revitalization aka Project Phoenix;
  • Interdisciplinary program how to’s or pitfalls - perhaps round table;
  • What do we teach – Leadership;
  • A multidisciplinary panel focused on the collaborative nature of theatre;
  • Marketing the life skills we offer; Living and learning - teaching the whole person;
  • USITT & ESTA Foundation promotion;
  • Risk assessment and safety.

Now is the time to connect. Our Conference Planner, Denise Massman, from Siena College, (dmassman@siena.edu) is ready to help get the ball rolling. You might even want to join us on facebook: ATHE Design & Technology Focus Group. Get the e-dialogue started before the proposal submission deadline of November first is on the doorstep.


Latino/a Focus Group

The Latino/a Focus Group invites panel proposals or individual paper proposals that address the conference theme broadly or deal with other engaging topics in the field of Latino/a and Latin American theatre and performance. In addition to the traditional format of paper panels, we also welcome alternative and innovative formats that bring together scholars and/or artists in dialogue (i.e. roundtables, collaborations, stage readings, talkbacks, etc.) for ATHE 2012 in Washington, D.C. In addition, we encourage participants to develop ideas, papers, and presentations related to the conference theme that highlight and articulate actions by Latinos/as that may be characterized as performative or theatrical modes of civil resistance and/or disobedience that incite engagement.

The Latina/o Focus Group is also interested in sessions that explore the specific ways performance, performative actions, theatrically conceived actions, and theatre can or have articulated civic engagement in the terms of conflicts that address the formation of nation, the implementation of law and public policy, gender, sexuality, education, militarization, and the multitude of social dilemmas and injustices pertinent to Latinos/as and Latin American peoples.

Topics and subjects to be considered could include:

  • How have theatre practice and/or performance actions intersected with the U.S.’s national debates concerning Latina/o immigration—past and present?
  • How have theatre practice and/or performance actions intersected with issues connected to labor—past and present?
  • Descriptions, examinations, and critiques of collaborations between theatre and performance artists and community organizers, organizations, or leaders for specific campaigns or issues.
  • How have different performance or theatre actions, Latino/a and Latin American theatre artists, or performance based projects stimulated civic dialogue about specific issues in Latina/o or Latin American communities (on a national and/or local scale)?
  • How have questions concerning gender or sexuality been explored in Latino/a or Latin America by theatre and performance to incite a civic dialogue about cultural mores concerning gender and sexuality?
  • Descriptions and documentations of how theatre or performance has been used to dissuade or articulate different forms of discrimination.
  • Papers and discussions that explore queer or counter-hegemonic self-fashioning as civic engagement.
  • Papers that explore civic events such as memorials, parades, festivals, dances, and other forms of formally organized public events and the participation of Latinos/as or Latin Americans for civic display.
  • Social protests that have employed theatre and/or performance to articulate dissidence and dissatisfaction. Theatre and/or performative actions used to incite or bolster political struggles.
  • Representations of civic engagement or dissidence in Latino/a and Latina America drama.
  • Creative practice in the use of theatre or performance in schools or pedagogical settings with Latina/o student populations.
  • Theatre or performance in conjunction with Latino/a or Latin American community centers, community organizers, or community education campaigns.
  • Pedagogical, practical, ideological, and repertoire issues connected to higher education and the Latina/o or Latin American scholar or student.

Submit individual papers to conference planner Irma Mayorga (historia34@yahoo.com) by October 15 to be possibly matched with others to compose a complete panel. If you submit a complete session, please forward a separate copy to Ms. Mayorga.


Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer Focus Group

The LGBTQ Focus Group invites panel, performance, roundtable, seminar, “text-and-response,” working group, and related proposals. Although presentations on all topics related to theatre and performance in general and to LGBTQ issues in particular will be considered, we encourage participants to develop ideas related to the conference theme, “Performance as/is Civic Engagement: Advocate, Collaborate, Educate,” and, more especially, to our Focus Group’s riff on that theme, “Outlaw Civics, Out Engagements.”

As the conference on the whole challenges us to consider every theatrical event as a mode of civic engagement, as well as to think about the necessity of theatre in our schools, cities, nations, and worlds, the LGBTQ Focus Group is interested in sessions exploring the specific ways in which LGBTQ scholars, performers, audiences, educators, and students act as advocates for civil disobedience and dissidence; for theatrical unrest and restlessness; for outlaw, outside, outsider, “out there,” and otherwise out performance. Questions to be considered could include:

  • How do LGBTQ and other marches on Washington figure as part of a repertoire of queer performances—including Pride parades, outdoor displays of the AIDS Memorial Quilt, and ACT UP street demonstrations—that conflate coming or being out with being outside? How may we account, queerly, for the intersections of different civil rights movements in which the (ritual?) performance of marches on Washington recur?
  • In cases like the Congressional opposition to the NEA 4, what effects do (highly theatrical) governmental debates have on the making, funding, media coverage, and public perceptions of queer performance, and when and how does governmental theatre itself constitute a form of queer performance? What kinds of queer theatre do political scandals make, especially those in which elected officials are outed?
  • In cases like the removal of David Wojnarowicz’s work from the National Portrait Gallery, how do local, national, or global forms of censorship affect queer lives and artworks? In turn, what are the performative contours of distinctly queer responses to the shaping and warping effects of censorship? Similarly, what are the effects of news outlets and related media on queer life-worlds and performance practices, and vice versa?
  • How may we look to seventeenth- and eighteenth-century materials or archives, such as those housed at the Smithsonian, to queer the “founding moment” of the United States?
  • What are the roles of theatre and performance in addressing queer-affirmative workplace ethics and in articulating the relationship, more broadly, of queerness to labor? And how may queer and/or labor activism consonate with disability activism? Where else do queerness and disability collide—or fail to collide—in twenty-first century education, performance, and scholarship?
  • How may queer inquiries like those framed above be used to interpret international and transnational performance practices? What civic roles do global outlaws play in their performances of queer engagement with the world?

We also invite session coordinators to think “queerly” about the kinds of sessions that they propose and the composition of the colleagues in those proposed sessions, as ATHE on the whole encourages a move away from traditional panels (though a certain number of traditional panel proposals are, of course, welcome). How, for instance, might a session incorporate a performance, a paper, and on-site response(s) to the paper and performance? How might we profit from a series of participants’ short, interpretive assessments of a single, guiding performance or text? What kind of conversation would emerge in a seminar whose members (scholars, artists—and others—alike) circulated pre-written papers and used those papers to generate discussion questions for the conference? And what more radical alternatives to the traditional panel have yet to be conceived?

Submit individual papers to conference planner Nick Salvato (ngs9@cornell.edu) by October 15 to be possibly matched with others to compose a complete panel. If you submit a complete session, please forward a separate copy to Mr. Salvato.


Music Theatre/Dance

The Music Theatre/Dance Focus Group invites panel proposals with the theme “Performance As/Is Civic Engagement: Advocate, Collaborate, Educate.” We welcome all panels and papers that address broad intersections of the theme and musical theatre and dance, including the following as possible topic areas:

  • the musical on film and television
  • form & structure of the musical
  • dance pedagogy & dance panels
  • opera/operetta and/or musicology
  • workshops – especially pedagogy of musical theatre performance or adjudicated
  • exercises
  • the musical and the American Dream
  • collaboration on between departments for musical productions on campus (as a possible roundtable)
  • particular composers & lyricists

We encourage proposals of complete panel, while also being willing to help unite individual papers, dealing with these or other topics related to MTD, with like-minded individuals. Oftentimes ideas are floated on our list-serv(musictheatredancelist@athe.org), and wonderful collaborations are found there. Your conference planner for MT/D is Stephanie Dean (scdean@umflint.edu). Please contact her if you have any questions and notify her when you have submitted your panel on the ATHE web site.


Religion and Theatre

The Religion and Theatre Focus Group invites panels that address any issues arising from the conference theme. In addition to the traditional format of paper panels, we also welcome proposals in the form of roundtables, collaborations, staged readings, talkbacks, and more.

The relationship between religion and civic engagement has always been complicated and compelling. In Washington D.C. late summer 2012, the dialogue between the two will be enhanced and focused during the presidential election. This site-specific conference suggests a number of avenues for fruitful discussion: What role does religion play in political performance? How might religious performance disrupt or enhance civic engagement? What are important or difficult collaborations between religious and civic performance? What have been important sites of advocacy for religion and theatre in the past/the present/the future?

Remember that panels are not just an opportunity to showcase the work of people already active in the field, but also to bring in fresh ideas and new faces. We encourage you to distribute your CFPs widely and to think creatively about how to engage in new conversations in your sessions.

Submit individual papers and workshops to Megan Jones by October 15 (msjones@byu.edu) to be possibly matched with others to compose a complete panel.


Theatre and Social Change

The Theatre and Social Change (TASC) Focus Group invites workshops, panel and proposals related to the conference theme, “Performance as/is Civic Engagement: Advocate, Collaborate, Educate,” and the intersections of performance, protest, and social change. TASC is particularly interested in experiential, hands-on workshops, demonstrations and presentations.

TASC invites submissions that document the power of theatre as an instrument of political, social, and cultural change. Since ATHE 2012 will take place in the nation’s capitol and only a few months before the national elections, TASC is particularly interested is considering:

  • What is the role of theatre and performance in shaping political debate and discourse?
  • What are innovative pedagogical strategies that can be employed at times of heightened political and societal crises and uncertainty?
  • How can we weave together both the teaching and practice of theatre with ongoing national and global events to affect change?
  • How have theatre and performance been used historically to subvert oppressive power structures and create more just systems of governance?

Submit individual papers and workshops to Willa Taylor by October 14 (willataylor@goodmantheatre.org) to be possibly matched with others to compose a complete panel. If you submit a complete session, please forward a separate copy to Ms. Taylor.


Theatre as a Liberal Art

Theatre as a Liberal Art is accepting proposals. As a focus group, TLA is interested in sponsoring panels that promote theatre as an integral, interdisciplinary component of the higher education experience and that articulate the significance of theatre as a discipline in the arts and humanities that intentionally reflects the human experience. In addition, TLA is interested in sponsoring panels that incorporate the conference theme of “Performance As/Is Civic Engagement: Advocate, Collaborate, Educate” into the broader focus area of Theatre as a Liberal Art. Some possible panel topics that have already been suggested include the following:

  • Educating the “total” artist
  • Development of an Interdisciplinary Fine Arts program
  • Advocating on behalf of all of the fine arts as a crucial component of the liberal arts experience
  • Highlighting unique teaching exercises and/or creative teaching assignments
  • The challenges of working in a small (often one person) department
  • Revising/Re-envisioning the core theatre arts curriculum
  • Educating future liberal arts administrators on the discipline of theatre
  • Advocating on behalf of theatre arts and the humanities to the broader civic community
  • Challenges of directing musicals in a B.A. program/Educating directors of Musical Theatre
  • Stronger collaboration between theatre arts educators and elected State and Federal representatives

Submit individual papers and workshops to Julie Schmitt by October 15 (jschmitt@stetson.edu) to be possibly matched with others to compose a complete panel.


Voice and Speech Trainers Association

As with the other focus groups, VASTA is excited with the possibilities of the 2012 Conference. We want to urge members and nonmembers of VASTA to submit proposals for this conference. The theme includes the statement, “How can we use performance to help our students find their voices as local, national, and global advocates?” The phrase, "help our students find their voices," especially stands out to our Focus Group. I urge potential presenters to think creatively in using this element of the theme as they formulate ideas for this conference. Please send your proposals to our Conference Planner, Kristen Loree, at realsticks@gmail.com by October 15. We look forward to hearing from you.


Women and Theatre Program

The Women and Theatre Program invites proposals. Proposed formats may include panels, performances, roundtables, seminars, “taught panels,” working groups, responses to a shared reading, or other related formats on all topics related to Women and Theater. Although presentations on all topics related to women and theater will be considered, we encourage participants to develop ideas related to the conference theme, “Performance as/is Civic Engagement: Advocate, Collaborate, Educate.”

As the conference on the whole challenges us to think about the relationship between theater and politics and the role of advocacy in theater, we are particularly interested in discussing the representation of women (or the inequality thereof) in all aspects of performance. We particularly encourage you to consider and address:

  • Bodily engagements – How do women’s bodies perform and disrupt theater, civic engagement, and activism? What is the role or responsibility of the body in civic engagements? When and how are bodies on the line in politics?
  • Uncivil engagements – When can, should, or have women been uncivil. How do civil disobedience or the refusal to be polite advance feminist agendas or characterize feminist practices? How can uncivil engagement still be civic engagement?
  • The public and the private – What are the spaces of feminist performance? How do women perform differently in the home, in cities, in politics, or on stage? How do theories of affect or publics and counterpublics contribute to the ideas of feminist performance or the role of women in public and private? Is the performance of affect or the study of affect particularly relevant to the performances of women?
  • Diversity among feminisms – How are various models (and waves) of feminisms performed? How do they intervene in public discourse differently? What common languages can we find? How can we and should we acknowledge and study the diversity among performances of feminism?
  • Minority voices in policy and performance – How is diversity repreented on stage and in politics? What and responsibilities roles do minorities (racial, sexual, physical or otherwise) have in crafting policy or performance on a local, national, and global level?
  • Queer collaborations – How do feminism and the study of gender and sexuality collaborate? What responsibilities and shared methodologies or strategies to we have to bridge rather than separate gender and sexuality?
  • Performance as/is feminist engagement – What are feminist strategies for pedagogies and collaboration? How are teaching and collaborating inherently feminist engagements or how can they use feminist practices to engage? How can feminist models of collaboration intervene in traditional performance models?
  • Videos and archives – What responsibilities and successes do we have in maintaining historical documents and records? What sources of videos and archives remain unstudied?
  • Shared readings or performances – What text(s) or performances might we all want to discuss? How can we incorporate an audience into a panel or other session?

We also invite session coordinators to think creatively about the kinds of sessions that they propose and the composition of the colleagues in those proposed sessions.

Submit individual paper proposals to Nicole Eschen (neschen@ucla.edu) by October 15 to be possibly matched with others to compose a complete panel.

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