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This page features TASC panels from previous years. A listing of 2011 panels will be available shortly after this year's conference in August.


2010 TASC Conference Panels – Los Angeles


Professional and Social networking for the Applied Theatre Practitioner Focus Group

Co-Chairs: Lesley Delmenico, Grinnell College; Brian Francois, Baltimore Theatre Project
Session Coordinator: Jason Price, University of Exeter (UK)

This panel explores the development of an applied theatre professional/social networking website. It will consider the functionality, purposes and reality of such a network and theorize the potential impact this tool might have on the work of applied theatre practitioners.

Activating the Campus: Can Performance Make a Difference?

Session Coordinator: Robin Stone, Roger Williams University, Starting the Discussion: Theatre and Social Change in General Education Courses.
Participants: Melanie Blood, State University of New York – Geneseo, Devised and Improvised Theatre for Social Change: Combining Theatrical Sources to Serve Different Audiences.
Lesley Delminico, Grinnell College, Cross-Campus Collaborations (and Adjacencies) in Political and Applied Performance.
Sarah Gabel, Loyola University Chicago, Developing Student Artists as Activists: Engaging First Year Students with the Mission of Art for Social Change.
Janna Goodwin, Regis University, Making Work: the Creation of Kocoloco Ensemble and Community-based Arts as a Campus/Professional Arts Community/Inner City Youth Collaborative.
Peter Harrigan, St. Michael’s College, Partnering for Survival: Making "Laramie” Everyone’s Project. Doug Paterson, University of Nebraska—Omaha, Service Learning in Deep Community.
Cathy Plourde, Addverb Productions, Yes, You Get to Do a Lot of Work and Pay Us for It.
Amy Sarno, Beloit College, Post-show Discussion = Social Change?: Our Jury’s Still Out”

Theatre faculty and professionals will explore the dynamics of social change performances on academic campuses. Discussion will include strategies to incorporate performances aimed at affecting social change into campus events, 66 classrooms, and other entities of our institutions and communities.

Theatre for International Development: Engaging the Voices of Communities

Chair: Beth Osnes, University of Colorado
Participants: Jason Bisping, University of Colorado, Theatre for Development in Rwanda
Lesley Delmenico, Grinnell College, Theatre for Development in Mumbai
Jennifer Popple, University of Colorado, Theatre for Development in Guatemala

This session will share experiences and methods for effectively engaging the voices of the community members that international development seeks to serve, acknowledging that international development has its own unique obstacles and rewards.

Collaborating for Social Change: From Local to International

Chair: Darci Strother, California State University San Marcos, Collaborating for Social Change: From Local to International...
Participants: Juan Escobedo, The East Los Angeles Society of Film and Arts, Collaborating for Social Change: From Local to International... Perspective from Academia, Perspective from the Non-Profit World
Jose Yenque, Professional Actor, Collaborating for Social Change: From Local to International... The Practitioner’s Perspective

When theatre practitioners, non-profits, and academia meet for a common purpose, social change can come about in underserved communities. This session offers examples from local (East L.A.) to international (Mexico/ Peru), and discusses best practice in achieving such multi-party collaboration.

The Essentials - Boal and Theatre of the oppressed: What are the Absolute [Totalizing!] Basics of To Theory and Practice?

Chair: Doug Paterson, The University of Nebraska at Omaha, Fightin’ Protagonists or Helpless Victims?
Participants:
Lindy Baumgarner, Richmond, VA, Boal Who?: The Introduction and Application of Boal and Theatre of the Oppressed to the Social Sciences
Norma Bowles, Fringe Benefits, Liberating Parameters: Jokering that Encourages Brave and Thoughtful Interventions
Lisa Brenner, Drew University, Problems and Possibilities: TO and Race on Campus
Kelly Howe, The University of Texas, Austin, Rehearsal, the Subjunctive, and (?) Making Something Happen
David Kaye, University of New Hampshire, The Bystander as Protagonist: Does Shifting Focus Affect Forum Theatre?
Matt Omasta, University of Rhode Island, TO Methodology in/as/and Facilitator-Directed Pedagogy: On the Possibilities and Implications of Abstracting TO Methods from the Terminology of "Oppression”
Chanelle Vigue, Bowling Green State University, Just the Basics: Forum in No Time

With Augusto Boal’s passing and with the proliferation of his vision, a vigorous, global dialogue has begun regarding "the sin qua non’s” of TO. After five minute analyses by each presenter, the event will be thrown open to wide-ranging discussion.

A Shift in the Discourse: Appropriation of Revolutionary Theatre by Conservative Organizations

Session Coordinators: Elizabeth Foster-Shaner, University of Wisconsin, Madison, The Reification of Tradition in Community-Based Performance
Sandy Peterson, University of Wisconsin, Madison, The Right-Wing and Boal: Rehearsal for the Counter-Revolution?
Participants: Jeff Casey, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Ecstatic Performance in Evangelical Youth Ministries
Chanelle Vigue, Bowling Green State University, Right-Wing Newspaper Theatre: Viral Email, Survival, and the Performance of Oppression

In our current political climate, the techniques of protest theatre are often appropriated by reactionary / conservative groups. We explore the dramaturgy of this movement, its place in the media discourse, and problematize authority and ownership over revolutionary theatre.

Theatre and Social Change: Performing Theatre of Testimony Inside and Outside the university Focus

Co-Coordinators: Lisa Brenner, Drew University, D*** UNIVERSITY: Using Theatre to Address Tensions Regarding Diversity on a
College Campus

Marietta Hedges, Catholic University, The Warrior
Participants:
Sharon Andrews, Wake Forest University, A Story of Us and Them: Student Athletes Explore, Create, and Perform
Brook Davis, Wake Forest University, A Story of Us and Them: Student Athletes Explore, Create, and Perform
Lesley Delmenico, Grinnell College, Testing the Echo, Pushing the Edges: Performing British Post-Multiculturalism

This panel examines theatre that creates intersections between disparate communities and the role of documentary theatre as a creative and political tool. We also look at how collaboration (between institutions or individuals) helps or hinders the process and the result.

(Re)Turning the Hollywood Gaze: Native Theater on Its own as Sites of Survival, Places of Remembrance, and Spaces of Transformation

Chair: Ann Haugo, Illinois State University
Session Coordinator: Jaye Darby, University of California, Los Angeles, How the West Was Lost: Native Theater and Hollywood Triumphantism
Participants: Jill Carter, University of Toronto, Kicking the Heroine Habit: Memorializing the Survivance Skirmishes and Little Victories of the Merely Mortal Women who Fought Them
Inés Hernández-Avila, University of California, Davis, Activist Performance/Transforming the Ecology of Violence: The First Year of Native American Theater on the UC Davis Campus
Tiffany Noell, Arizona State University, Vision Transformations: Circles of Survivance within Marie Clements’ "Copper Thunderbird”

An examination of the performative agency of Native theater with activist roots in tribal communities to honor and enact the lived realities, histories, traditions, and perspectives of the rich diversity of Native peoples, contesting Hollywood’s hegemonic narratives and distorted representations.

"A-live-ing History: Exploring new Archivist and Activist Impulses in Documentary Theatre”

Chair: Jules Odendahl-James, Duke University
Participants: Joan Lipkin, That Uppity Theatre Company, Beyond stonewall: Why We March. An Exploration of New Strategies for Documentary Theatrical Activism
Magda Romanska, Emerson College, Trauma, Testimony and Documentary Performance in Heath Raffo’s "Nine Parts of Desire”

Bringing Light to the Darkness Where the Worst of us are Kept: using Theatre to Connect to Correctional Institutions

Chair: Curt Tofteland, Shakespeare Behind Bars, Behind the Bard-Wire: Reflection, Responsibility, Redemption, and Forgiveness: The Transformative Power of Art, Theatre, & Shakespeare
Participants: Laura Bates, Indiana State University, Shakespeare Saved My Life: Reflections from Solitary Confinement at the Wabash Valley Correctional Facility
Krista Hagstrom, University of Victoria, Young Offenders in Performance: Reflections from Victoria Youth Custody Services Center
Erin Kaplan, Prison Creative Arts Project Associates Network, Acting out: Creating Theatre Behind Bars

This session will share the transformational work of theatre artists who have been successfully working with the incarcerated for many years.

Multidisciplinary Panels

Teatro Chicana: A Collective Memoir

Focus Group: 36 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus:24 (LFG) Latina/o Focus Group; 23 (WTP) Women and Theatre Program; 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change
Co-Coordinators: Evelyn Diaz Cruz, University of San Diego; Patricia Herrera, University of Richmond
Participants: Laura E. Garcia
Sandra M. Gutierrez
Delia Rodriguez
Hilda Rodriguez, San Diego City College Felicitas Nuñez
Respondent: Priscilla Page, University of Massachusetts Amherst

In this roundtable discussion, contributing authors of Teatro Chicana (UT Press, 2008) will discuss how the collective used theatre as a tool to empower Latinas and to raise political consciousness about human rights, worker rights, im- migration and gender issues.

The Laramie Project: Ten Years Later – Perspectives on Media, Social Change, and a National Theatre

Focus Group: 36 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 10 (LGBT) Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender; 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change; 05 (BTA) Black Theatre Association
Chair: Virginia Anderson, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo
Co-Coordinator: Paul Jackson, Miami University
Participants: Charlotte Headrick, Oregon State University
Mary-Margaret Kunze, Carnegie Mellon University
Leah Lowe, Connecticut College
Bobbi McKean, University of Arizona, Tucson
Dan Rogers, Bismark State College
Respondent: Tectonic Theater Project representative

Participants in staged readings of THE LARAMIE PROJECT: TEN YEARS LATER discuss their institutions’ contributions to the national event, the formation of an online community of artists and supporters, and the role of theatre within contemporary social and political change.

Survival Among the Fittest: Forging a Space for Theater at an Elite Technological Institute

Focus Group: 36 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus: 07 (DR) Dramaturgy; 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change; 02 (ATDS) American Theatre and Drama Society
Session Coordinator: Karen Jean Martinson, Dramaturgy for Scientists: Documenting the Rigor of the Performing Arts
Participants: Brian Brophy, California Institute of Technology, A Curious Community: TACIT as CBT
Steve Collins, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Balancing the Worlds: Theater in the Space between Earth and Mars
Meg Rosenburg, California Institute of Technology, Bridging the Divide: Theatre in the Hands of Future Engineers and Scientists

Using the unique example of Theater at the California Institute of Technology (TACIT), this panel explores the complicated relationship between science and the arts, interrogating issues of intellectual rigor, academic status, and theater’s survival at an elite technological institute.

Creating a Sustainable Theatre to Survive and Thrive in the 21st Century

Focus Group: 36 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus: 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change; 20 (TM)
Theatre Management; 21 (TYCP) Two-Year College Program
Co-Chairs: Siobhan Bremer, University of Minnesota; Morris Ellen Jones, Bemidji State University

A green theatre is not only good for the environment and the health of our participants; it also makes good economic sense. Partnering with our colleagues across disciplines as well as local community members can help make it hap- pen.

Theatre, Media, and Ecology: From Surviving to Thriving

Focus Group: 36 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus: 17 (TC) Theory and Criticism; 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change; 23 (WTP) Women and Theatre Program
Co-Chairs: Downing Cless, Tufts University, Toward Ecodirecting: Making Nature and Enviroment Live on Stage
Theresa May, University of Oregon, Radio as Presence of Absence in Marie Clements’ "Burning Vision”
Participants: Sara Freeman, University of Oregon, Alternative Theatre and the Anti-Nuclear Movement: Eco-Conscious Theatre in Thatcher’s Britain
Damoid Morris, University of Oregon, Hard Times and Sustainable Measures: Film on Stage and the Federal Theater Project’s Ecological Footprint
Arden Thomas, Stanford University, Entangled, Embodied, Engaged: Technology and Ecology in the Performance Art of Rachel Rosenthal

Theatre embodies ecology even as the media has made ecology newsworthy. Key ecocritical concerns - embodiment, polyphony, ecofeminism - focus on the role of theatre in the ecological crisis, demonstrating the reciprocity (and resistance) between media and theatre.

2009 Conference Panels – New York (with AATE)

Community Partnerships: Using Drama to Teach HIV Education in the African-American Church

Session Coordinator: Bett Potazek, Kaiser Permanente Educational Theatre Programs
Co-Coordinators: Larry Davis, Kaiser Permanente Educational Theatre Programs
Betty Hart, Kaiser Permanente Educational Theatre Programs

Join us as we discuss how Kaiser Permanente Educational Theatre Programs partners with African- American churches to respond to the ever growing HIV epidemic in the African-American community.

Towards a Captive Audience: Intersecting Issues and Artistry, Avoiding Triage, and Making a Difference

Chair: Norma Bowles, Fringe Benefits Theater
Actors: Megan Hart, Add Verb Productions
Lloyd Watts, Add Verb Productions
Participant: Cathy Plourde, Add Verb Productions

"Issue-Based” theatre gone wrong gives good work a bad name. And, it doesn’t have to be that way. Playwright/activist Cathy Plourde shares a decade of the work of Add Verb Productions.

Community-Based Theatre for Social Justice (CBTFSJ) is the Theatre’s New "Green Economy”

Session Coordinator: Michael Mufson, Palomar College
Participants: Rebecca Brown Adelman, University of Colorado at Boulder
Gail Campbell, University of Windsor
Lesley Delmenico, Grinnell College
Brian Francoise, Goucher College
Lynn Hoare, University of Texas at Austin
Kate Mendeloff, University of Michigan
Douglas Paterson, The University of Nebraska at Omaha
Tina Pugliese, University of Windsor
Amy Sarno, Beloit College
Ben Saypol, University of North Carolina
Dani Snyder, Illinois Wesleyan University
Bethany Urban, Boulder, CO

This roundtable will examine why Community-Based Theatre for Social Justice is the ethical and pragmatic solution to grow theatre in response to the challenges and crises of the new century.

Ouch and Oops: Best (and Worst) Practices for Theatre with or for Youth Populations

Chair: Peter Harrigan, Saint Michael’s College
Participant: Lindy Bumgarner, Tufts University, p-Hop Theatre Primer
Selina Busby, Central School of Speech and Drama- London
Alyssa Herzog, University of Pittsburgh, Practicing what we Teach: CHOOSE YOUR WORDS CAREFULLY
Cheryl Kaplan, University of Texas Medical Branch, HIV/AIDS: It Ain’t Over
Catherine McNamara, Central School of Speech and Drama – London, Applied Theatre Practice as Pedagogical Fodder: Student Involvement as Balancing Act
Jay Pecora, SUNY Potsdam, Is it Empowerment or Chaos? Issues of Control in the Dramatic Classroom
Valerie Smith, Messiah College, Fear Factor: The Oops and Ouch of Devising Theatre for Social Change with Undergraduates
Respondent: Brian Francoise, Goucher College

In the Risk that is Theatre, we experience invigorating successes and embarrassing failures. Six artists share mis-steps then listen to YOUR stories in a
safe atmosphere that can inspire all.

Theatre for Cultural and Social Awareness: Power and Privilege - A Theatrical Model of Organizational Change from the Inside Out

Participants: Talish Barrow, University of Wisconsin Madison
Elizabeth Foster-Shaner, University of Wisconsin Madison
Jacqui Scott, University of Wisconsin Madison
Patrick Sims, University of Wisconsin Madison

This workshop will focus on guiding participants through the TCSA model of developing performance and facilitation material as it relates to sensitive subject matters.

More Blueprints for Change - Models of Effective Curriculum which Integrate Site-Based Arts Work and Theater for Social Change

Session Coordinator: Kate Mendeloff, University of Michigan, Creating a Model for Change-- Integrating Site Work and Social Justice Learning
Co-Coordinator: Brian Francoise, Goucher College, Breaking Boundaries
Participants: Beca Fried, Residential College Community Collaborative, Lesson Plans- Evolving Curriculum for Theater and Social Justice
Deborah Gordon-Gurfinkel, SOS Family Services, Ozone House, COPE school, The "Telling It” Model

This roundtable continues a dynamic discussion begun at ATHE 2008 about how to best create models that integrate community outreach into curriculum. It will focus particularly on how to effectively bring internship experiences into dialogue with more theoretical learning in the syllabus.

Putting it Together: Aiding the Healing Process--A Community Partnership Between Kaiser Permanente Educational Theatre Programs and Camp Magik

Coordinator: Bett Potazek, Kaiser Permanente Educational Theatre Programs
Co-Coordinators: Betty Hart, Kaiser Permanente Educational Theatre Programs; Rene Searles McClatchey, Camp Magik

Join us to discuss the unique collaboration between KP ETP and Camp Magik, an award-winning grief camp for children. We will discuss the collaborative process and the synergy that resulted in socially relevant drama that enhanced the effectiveness of this life-changing camp.

Can Activist Theatre Really Change Minds? Kent State Searches for some Qualitative and Quantitative Answers to this Question

Chair: Daniel Nadon, Kent State University, Butting Heads: Using Theatre to Bring Together Leaders on Both Sides of the Death Penalty Issue in Ohio
Participants: James Canacci, Kent State University, The Lucasville Project: My Story of Human Rights, Social Activism, and Theatre
Susan Iverson, Kent State University, The Use of Theatre to Change Students’ Attitudes Regarding LGBT Issues

This panel will attempt to quantify the effectiveness of three activist theatrical texts and contexts and the reaction to seeing them performed in one Midwestern Ohio town.

Applied and Community-Based Theatre Step to the Graduate Stage: The Two New MA Programs in the US

Coordinator: Doug Paterson, The University of Nebraska at Omaha, Early Stages in Graduate Education in Community-Based and Applied Theatre
Participants: Brent Blair, University of Southern California, Opening Soon: USC’s Program in Community-Based and Applied Theatre
Chris Vine, The City University of New York - Kendall School, Now Open: City University of New York’s MA Program in "Applied Theatre”

2008 ATHE sessions -- Augusto Boal, and Elephants in the Room -- demonstrated an electric interest in Applied and Community-Based Theatre. Our session highlights two new graduate programs in these essential fields.

Multidisciplinary Panels

Political Disasters and Disastrous Politics

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change; 14 (RT) Religion and Theatre; 47 (Network) College/University/Research
Coordinator: Wendell Stone, University of West Georgia, The Technocratic and the Technological: Nuclear Devastation in "Only a Countess May Dance When She’s Crazy”
Participants: Stephen Berwind, Manchester Metropolitan University-Cheshire, The Devil in Dublin: 21st Century Irish-Catholicism in "The Seafarer” and "Terminus”
Amy Cuomo, University of West Georgia, "Katrina: The K Word” and the Politics of Disaster
Mark Zelinsky, Saint Joseph College, Christopher Shinn’s "Dying City” or Just Who’s Killing Whom?

Using theatrical representations of various disasters, this panel investigates ways in which such events have become enmeshed in political discourse.

Risking Innovation within Institutions: Using Theatre of the Oppressed and "Rainbow of Desire” in Religious, Theatrical, Educational, and Research Settings

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change; 47 (Network) College/University/Research; 46 (Network) Applied Theatre
Coordinator: Dani Snyder, Illinois Wesleyan University, Theatre of the Oppressed as Action Research: Deconstructing Social Antagonism with Urban Youth
Participants: Dena Davis Freed, Arizona State University, Forum Theatre Innovations in Biblical Literature Analysis with Drama Students
Teresa Fisher, New York University, If Obesity is so Bad, Why are so many People Fat?: Interrogating, Exploring, and Understanding Obesity through Theatre
Victoria Row-Traster, New Victory Theater, Using "Rainbow of Desire” for Post Performance Workshops for Redmoon’s "Hunchback”

What does it mean to adapt work initially conceived as "rehearsal for revolution” into the pre-existing power structures of institutions? This panel examines case studies using Augusto Boal’s interactive theatre praxis in diverse institutional contexts.

Working Classroom: Developing Voices and Identity within Community

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 22 (VASTA) Voice and Speech Trainers Association; 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change; 56 (Network) Youth Theatre
Chair: Micha Espinosa, Arizona State University
Participants: Nan Ellsasser, Working Classroom
Moïses Kaufman, Tectonic Theatre Project
Gabriela Mayorga, Working Classroom
Lisandra Tena, Working Classroom

Working Classroom: An alternative path to professional development in a street conservatory with high quality, economically, geographically and culturally accessible training to talented students from historically ignored communities.

The Neighborhood Bridges Program: Bring Critical Literacy to your Community!

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change; 54 (Network) Professional Development; 46 (Network) Applied Theatre
Chair: Kiyoko Motoyama Sims, Community Engagement, The Children’s Theatre Company
Participants: Tom Arvetis, Adventure Stage Chicago Maria Asp, Neighborhood Bridges Program Director
Daniel Kelin, Honolulu Theatre for Youth

Experience the innovative, theatre-based critical literacy program, Neighborhood Bridges, and learn how the Bridges pedagogy has impacted theatre companies, school districts and university theatre programs across the country.

Striking The Match: Revisiting the Ludlow Miners’ Strike with Urban Youth

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change; 47 (Network) College/University/Research; 46 (Network) Applied Theatre
Co-Chairs: Robert Colby, Emerson College; Bethany Nelson, Emerson College
Participants: Amy Czarnowski, Chelsea High School

This hands-on, process drama workshop explores the Ludlow Massacre, the climax of a coal miners’ strike in 1914. The results of a research project using this curriculum with urban students will be discussed.

Student Production Workshop: Building a Community of Confident, Expressive Global Citizens

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 55 (Network) Professional Theatre; 56 (Network) Youth Theatre; 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change
Coordinator: Jennifer DiBella, Roundabout Theatre Company
Co-Coordinators: Jay Gerlach, Roundabout Theatre Company; Aliza Greenberg, Roundabout Theatre Company

Participants and staff from Roundabout’s after-school student-run theatre company will present a model for empowering members to engage with a community beyond their local network through student-led performance and discussion.

Colonial/Post/Neocolonial Modernity’s: Childhood and the Interrogation of Power Through Education and Performance

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 47 (Network) College/University/Research; 49 (Network) International; 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change
Coordinator: Michelle Solberg, University of Wisconsin-Madison, An Empire Wide As His Soul: Shakespeare and Education in Colonial India
Participants: Jessica Brown-Velez, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Advocating Life: Theatre and HIV/AIDS in Twenty-First Century Uganda
Joohee Park, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Makings of a Modern Child: School Theatre in Postwar Korea

This panel problematizes and discusses the position of education and performance in the context of colonial, postcolonial, and neocolonial modernity’s, exploring how power dynamics and theoretical positioning directly influence the tenor of this discussion.

Signs of Change and Temporary Stages: Questioning Traditional Assumptions About Secondary Theatre Education

Chair: Roxanne Schroeder-Arce, Emerson College
Participants: Jo Beth Gonzalez, Bowling Green High School, Temporary Stages
Joan Lazarus, University of Texas at Austin, Signs of Change: Moving Beyond 20th Century Models of Theatre Education

This workshop models ways teachers question traditional assumptions about instruction and production work. Learner centered/socially responsible practices that help students develop critical awareness and increase self-agency will be explored.

2008 Conference Panels – Denver

*LINKS* Playing to Transgress: A Forum and Playback Theatre Workshop For Generating Dialogue in the Multicultural/Multilingual Classroom

Co-Coordinators: Nestor Bravo-Goldsmith, Arizona State University-Herberger College of the Arts
Jorge Gonzalez, Arizona State University-Herberger College of the Arts
Mariah Keko, Arizona State University-Herberger College of the Arts
Jen Yin Lin, Arizona State University-Herberger College of the Arts
Isel Rodriguez, Arizona State University-Herberger College of the Arts
Xanthia Walker, Arizona State University-Herberger College of the Arts
Phyllis Wong, Arizona State University-Herberger College of the Arts

The goal for our workshop is to take the real life scenarios that the academic community encounters in the multicultural/multilingual class- room and engage in a process of critical dialogue through the use of forum and playback theatre.

Disabled Performers In (and Against) the Mainstream

Session Coordinator: Oliver Gerland, University of Colorado at Boulder
Participants: Victoria Ann Lewis, University of Redlands, The Last Taboo: The Disabled Actor
Carrie Sandahl, Florida State University, Crip Humor in the Florida Actual Lives Project

Leading disability rights activists, scholars and theatre artists address the relationship between disabled performers and dominant trends in American society, actor training, and stage practice.

Blueprints for Change: Creating and Implementing Effective Curricular Programs in Community Collaboration and Social Justice

Session Coordinator: Kate Mendeloff, University of Michigan Residential College
Participants: Rebecca Brown, University of Colorado, Boulder, Creating an interactive theatre for social change within the university setting
Lindy Bumgarner, Tufts University, The "Social” in Theatre for Social Change: Teaching Theatre in the Social Sciences
Gail Collins, University of Windsor, Canada, Outlines for the steps taken to build community contacts and the courses needed to create the community stream.
Brian Francoise, Goucher College, How does a "foundation” course that professes to survey the history, the theory, and the exemplar practitioners of "community-based performance” end up helping to organize an arts and activism festival?
Beca Fried, University of Michigan Residential College Community, The challenge of creating a curriculum for a community-based arts course
Peter Harrigan, St. Michael’s College, Vermont, First Steps - creating a theater and social justice class within the framework of the First Year Seminar
Trent Norman, University of Colorado, Boulder, More perspectives on the Interactive Theater Project
Amy Sarno, Beloit College, "Do You See What I’m Saying?: Successes and Frustrations in Community-based Classes”.
Ben Saypol, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Designing "Interactive Theatre for Social Change: A theatrical service learning experience”
Valerie Smith, Messiah College, Balancing Acts: The Relationship Between Theory and Practice in the Undergraduate Theatre and Social Change Course

TASC members who have created curricular models of community collaboration will present their work and engage the audience in an open discussion about how to institute effective programs.

What Do Good Intentions Do? Reflections on Using Theatre to Address White Racism on Predominately White Campuses

Co-Coordinators: Ann Marie Gardinier Halstead, St. Lawrence University, What Do Good Intentions Do? Reflections on Using Theatre to Address White Racism on Predominately White Campuses
Jay Pecora John Youngblood

Colleagues from two universities, public and private, discuss using theatre to dialogue about white racism at their predominately white campuses. Participants will engage in "difficult dialogue” about race and theatre.

*LINKS* Playback Improvisation in Macro/Micro Communities: Engaging in Difficult Dialogues Through Creativity, Spontaneity, and Personal Stories.

Session Coordinator: Anne-Liese Juge Fox, NOLA Playback Theatre, L.S. U. Dept. of Theatre Participant: Leilani Rashida Henry, National Ensemble Playback Theatre

NOLA Playback Theatre (New Orleans) and National Ensemble Playback Theatre (Denver) offer a demonstration and skills workshop of Playback Improvisation followed by discussion of application of Playback to community processes.

Multidisciplinary Panels

"Vocalizing the Voices of Natural Disaster in Denver and the Katrina Project in New Orleans - ATHE/BTN

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 5 (BTA) Black Theatre Association, 26 (PDC) Professional Development Committee, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change
Co-Coordinator: Dr. Gail Medford BTN
Session Coordinator:...Gale Sheaffer, Advocacy, Theater Ed Reform
Participant: Dr. Charlotte D’Armand Talbert, Guest - Coordinator, SCC, Scientific and Cultural, Metro Denver’s commitment to the Arts - Collaborative of 28 arts organizations
Dr. Kathy Ervin, BTN Dr. Gail Humphries-Mardirosian, Professional Development Committee, American University Theatre bridges partnership with O Perry High School, New Orleans
Laurie Mufson, TASC, The Katrina Project - ATHE outreach
Dr. Andrew Svedelow, Guest - Dean, College of Performing Arts, Univ. of, Theatre to Bridge Disaster in the Local Scene - Colorado Projects

Participants in last year’s New Orleans Katrina Project will come together to focus on last year’s experience. In addition each will present and comment on the session title and present their own projects and insights. An electronic presentation of last year’s events will be presented. In addition a participants from Denver who also works with these "voices” will be part of the session. Also we will have a Denver "Katrina Project” in place during, before or after this session.

Talking Terror, Part I: Terrorism and Theory

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 13 (PS) Performance Studies, 17 (TC) Theory and Criticism, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change
Session Coordinator: Kevin Brown, University of Colorado at Boulder, ‘Afghan TV’: Futurism, Postmodernism, and Terrorism
Participants: Sara Brady, Trinity College, Dublin, ‘Lookin’ for Jack Bauer’: Complicating Fiction, Reality, and Denial
Jenny Spencer, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Bringing the War Home in Ravenhill’s ‘Shoot/Get Treasure/Repeat’

Part one of a two-part series, this session attempts to examine the war on terror from various perspectives. Three papers will be fol- lowed by a brief question and answer session.

Strangers in the Night: Minority Focus Groups, Competition versus Collaboration, and Meeting at Least Once in a Room to Dialogue

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 5 (BTA) Black Theatre Association, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change, 24 (LFG) Latina/o Focus Group
Session Coordinator: David Catanzarite, Member, ATHE and Black Theatre Network
Co-Coordinator: Oliver Mayer, Member, Latino Focus Group
Participants: Guillermo Aviles-Rodriguez
Daniel Banks, NYU
Nataki Garrett, California Institute for the Arts
Jorge Huerta, Latino/a Focus Group
Carlenne Lacosta, Native Voices at the Autry Museum

A difficult dialogue about competition and collaboration among Blacks, Latinos, and other ethnic minorities. Common and not- so-common issues from inner city neighborhoods and public schools to academia and the professional theatre. The second part of this double session will be a reception/mixer with food and music for members of our minority focus groups, whose sessions at ATHE are almost always scheduled in opposition.

Spectacles of Incarceration: (Im)Prison(ment) and/as Performance

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus; 13 (PS) Performance Studies, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change, 17 (TC) Theory and Criticism
Session Coordinator: Frank Episale, Graduate Center, City University of New York
Participants: Laura Hope, Loyola University, Margaretta D’Arcy in Jail: "Loose Theatre,” Rebel Women’s Bodies, and the Performing the Abject in Northern Ireland’s Armagh Prison
Noe Montez, Indana University, Money the Hard Way: The Performance of Rehabilitation at the Oklahoma
Jules Odendahl-James, Duke University, Private Dancer: GaGa over the YouTube Thriller Filipino Prison Show

An exploration of prison performances in the information age: from Oklahoma, to the Philippines, to Northern Ireland. Issues of agency, rehabilitation, and the exoticization of the prisoner are examined.

2007 Conference Panels – New Orleans

The Regenerative Force of New Orleans Community Artists: A Round Table, a Cabaret, and an Award

Co-Coordinators: Brian Francoise, Goucher College; Katherine Mendeloff, University of Michigan, Residential College

Come join a round-table dialogue with New Orleans community-based artists discussing how their work is responding to the unique activism, community-building, organizing, and popular education called for by the post-Katrina climate of New Orleans.

Ghosts of the Past, Present and Future: Oral History with the living and the dead

Co-Coordinators: Cathy Plourde, Add Verb Productions, Hear Our Stories, Know Our Names
Amy Sarno, Beloit College, Beloit Ghost Stories Project

Ghosts of the present, past and future hold secrets, shame, and salvation. The forgotten, ignored and oppressed of New Orleans--both the living and those who have passed--share much with the forgotten, ignored, oppressed of other parts of this country. Oral history make waken the dead, call for belated justice, or just piss off those who would rather the issues of race, and class would go away.

Modernism: The Aesthetic of the Bourgeoisie; or, How Do You Solve a Problem Like the Modern?

Session Coordinator: Doug Paterson, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Participants: Meredith Conti, University of Pittsburgh, I Remember Mama: La Mama’s Past and Present in the 2006” /Tooth...The Tooth of Crime/ Revival”
Bruce McConachie, University of Pittsburgh
Framji Minwalla, Dartmouth College, Modernism will prevent regeneration in New Orleans.

Its "diversity” is window dressing for an imperial modern culture. Theatre makers should understand and dismantle it for new worlds to be born.

The Regenerative Links between Activism and Academia: What Does it Mean to Get One’s Hands Dirty?

Participants: Brian Francoise, Goucher College
Peter Harrigan, Saint Michael’s College
Katherine Mendeloff, University of Michigan, Residential College
Respondent: Michael Mufson, Palomar College

A panel of activist-academics explore the links, tensions and disconnects that exist between one’s activism in one context and one’s role as a "teacher” in the academic culture.

`Capers: a solo play about forced relocation and the human right to housing

Coordinator: Anupama Yadav, independent artist, ‘Capers: a solo play about forced relocation and the human right to housing

Excerpted performance and discussion of `Capers, a solo play based on the stories of DC public housing residents who protested the government-funded displacement of their neighborhood.

Reactive Regenerations: Theater and Revolutions

Session Coordinator: Domnica Radulescu, Washington and Lee University, Revolutions, Wars, Transformations - Theater from and about Post-Communist Eastern Europe
Participants: Kate Bredeson, Dalhousie University Paris, May 1968- Revolution as Theater and the Revolutions of Theatre du Soleil and the Aquarium
Grace Correa, Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Individual Ethical and Revolutionary Change in Nordahl Grieg’s "The Defeat” and Joan Holden’s "Spain/36”
Ian Andrew MacDonald, Dickinson College, The Trouble with Revolution: Representing Genocide in The Terrible but Unfinished History of Norodom Sihanouk, King of Cambodia
Tamara Smith, University of Texas at Austin, Tinseled Aristocracy and the Equality of Men: the Astor Place Riot as Revolutionary Regeneration
Klaus van den Berg, University of Tennessee, Political Performances of Schiller’s "The Robbers”

This panel proposes to explore models of theatrical movements and performative endeavors that have been tied to reversals of oppressive socio-political structures, to raising consciousness about social injustices and genocides, and that have simultaneously revolutionized theatrical forms in radical ways.

Multidisciplinary Panels

The Dead Man Walking School Theatre Project: Re-imagining the Boundaries of Theatre and Discourse (Double Session)
Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change, 19 (TLA) Theatre as a Liberal Art, 21 (TYCP) Two-Year College Program
Chair: John Taylor, Adams State College, The Art of Community Engagement: A Case Study of the ASC Dead Man Walking Theatre Project
Participant: Gary Armagnac, University of the Pacific, Dead Man Walking: Directorial Challenges and Opportunities
Crystal Brian, Quinnipiac University, "You Must See It”: Dead Man Walking, Ethical Teaching and the Theatre of Witness
Michael Elkins, Notre Dame de Namur University, Dead Man Walking: The Power, Privilege and Responsibilities Associated with Teaching and Producing Socially Provocative Theatre in Schools
Maureen Fenlon, The Dead Man Walking School Theatre Project, Giving a Play Away: Tim Robbins’ Act of Entrusting the Voice of Social Change to the Younger Generation
Sarah Gabel, Loyola University Chicago, The Dead Man Walking Theatre Project/Loyola University Chicago: Raising Awareness, Building Academic Community, and Increasing Support for the Arts
James Gallant, Elms College Theatre for Social Justice, Dialogue, Discourse and Directing: The Challenges of Dead Man Walking
Charlene Gould, Avila University, Re-imagining Gender and Religion: The Sisters of St. Joseph and Social Justice
Chris Lockwood, Elms College Theatre for Social Justice, Dialogue, Discourse and Directing: The Challenges of Dead Man Walking
Barbara Marder, Anne Arundel Community College, A Mandate for Collaboration: Integrating Theatre, Criminal Justice, Sociology, Playwriting, and the Local Community
Ann Shanahan, Loyola University Chicago, The Dead Man Walking Theatre Project/Loyola University Chicago: Raising Awareness, Building Academic Community, and Increasing Support for the Arts

From innovative directing to creative acts of community engagement, this roundtable explores the social, political, educational, and artistic aspects of the national DMW project.

"Speak of me as I am”: Remembering Shakespeare and Post/colonial Asia

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus, 3 (AAP) Association for Asian Performance, 13 (PS) Performance Studies, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change
Session Coordinator: Alexander Huang Pennsylvania State University, Shakespearean Orients
Co-Coordinator: Nurul Farhan Low, University of Malaya, Eddin Khoo’s Puppet Shadow Theater Macbeth in Malaysia
Participants: Ricardo G. Abad, Ateneo de Manila University, The Philippines Resistance and Accommodation to Empire: Filipino Productions of Shakespeare’s "Taming of the Shrew” and a "Midsummer’s Night Dream”
Lorelle Browning, Pacific University, Vietnam-America Theatre Exchange and Its Shakespeare Productions
Evan Darwin Winet, Macalester College, Sons and Fathers: Shakespearean Surrogation and President Soeharto in Rendra’s "Hamlet” and Anirun’s "Lear”

Dancing at the Crossroads: Intersections of Voodoo Performance and Vodou Practice

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus, 13 (PS) Performance Studies, 14 (RT) Religion and Theatre, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change
Chair: Lance Gharavi, Arizona State University
Session Coordinator: Jason Winslade, DePaul University, Drumming at the Temple: Vodou Rhythms at a Neopagan Festival
Participants: Christopher Danowski, Arizona State University, Saints Gone Wild: Voodoo Performance and Mediating the Unmediable
Lilith Dorsey, Independent Scholar, Performing the Invisible: New Orleans Voodoo Revealed

Post-Katrina New Orleans sets the stage for our rite of invocation, in which we manifest some of the issues and conflicts surrounding the practice and commodification of voodoo in America.

Regenerating Praxis: A Roundtable on Empathy, Activism, and Performance in Times of Crisis Focus

Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus, 17 (TC) Theory and Criticism, 23 (WTP) Women and Theatre Program, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change
Chair: John Fletcher, Louisiana State University
Participants: Rhonda Blair, Southern Methodist University
Gay Gibson Cima, Georgetown University
Anne-Liese Juge-Fox, Louisiana State University
Linda Kintz, University of Oregon
Sonja Kuftinec, University of Minnesota

In this panel, the capstone of the "Regenerating Praxis” series, a roundtable of scholar-practitioners pose and address difficult questions about the ethics of theatrical intervention in crisis and post-crisis contexts.

Droppin’ Knowledge Through Hip-Hop Performance

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus, 5 (BTA) Black Theatre Association, 13 (PS) Performance Studies, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change
Session Coordinator: Kevin Poole, Naropa University, Empty MCs: Spoken Word as a Dialogical Performance
Participants: Holly Bass, New Orleans Performer, Scholar
Nicole Hodges Persley, University of Southern California, The Notorious Nikki S Lee: Improvisation, Blackness and the "Hip-hop Project”
Respondent: Daniel Banks, New York University

Investigating the intersection of hip-hop culture with theater and performance. Exploring opportunities for social engagement and community activism by unsettling the boundaries of hip-hop and theater through diverse performance practices.

Teaching Theatre, Theatricality, and Politics of War

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus, 13 (PS) Performance Studies, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change, 19 (TLA) Theatre as a Liberal Art
Co-Coordinators: Melanie Blood, SUNY Geneseo, Staging the War in Iraq: The U.S. Media At Work
Leah Garland, SUNY Geneseo, School Days and THE ARABIAN NIGHTS: Mary Zimmerman’s Play as Locus for University Response to the War in Iraq
Participants: Kevin Brown, University of Colorado, Boulder Military Presence: Performance in the Iraqi "Theatre” of Operations
Beth Cleary, Macalester College, Politics, Pedagogy, and Theatre: Staging Naomi Wallace’s IN THE HEART OF AMERICA at Macalester College

Performance scholars and theatre practitioners will investigate different performance examples, particularly those at university theatres, to analyze critically debates over performance and the current war in Iraq.

Intersections of Religion, Performance, and Social Agency, Part I: Sacred Identities

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus, 14 (RT) Religion and Theatre, 13 (PS) Performance Studies, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change
Session Coordinator: Christopher Swift, Graduate Center, City University of New York
Participant: Dominika Bennacer, New York University, Disciplining the Body: The Role of Body Techniques in the Performance of Muslim Identities
Barry Kendall, Stanford University, The Methodist Walk: Piety and Dissociation in Early Evangelical Practice
Kate Kokontis, University of California, Berkeley, "Reclaiming the land of their birth”: Of poetics, politics, and pilgrimages: San Francisco Bay Area Day of the Dead

This multidisciplinary panel focuses on the ways religious discourse and performance operate in fields of social power, particularly how these intercessions construct corporate and somatic identities.

Intersections of Religion, Performance, and Social Agency, Part II: From the Periphery to the Center, and back again

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus, 14 (RT) Religion and Theatre, 13 (PS) Performance Studies, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change
Session Coordinator: Christopher Swift, Graduate Center, City University of New York
Participants: Demir Barlas, Cornell University, Sacred Public Performance: How Ta’ziyeh Theater Challenges Formal Muslim Notions of Religious Space
Joy Crosby, University of California, Berkeley, Talking with the Other: Returning to a Concept of the Sacred in Performance Studies
Donny Levit, Graduate Center, City University of New York, "Throes Me Somethin,’ Mistuh”: Legislative Presentationalism and Neoritual Performance in Response to the City of New Orleans’s 1991 Mardi Gras Ordinance

This multidisciplinary panel focuses on the ways religious discourse and performance operate in fields of social power, particularly how these intercessions enable activism and revitalization of the community.

Theatre Productions that engage our students in the Community, and bring new Communities into our Theatres

Focus Group: 40 (MD) Multidisciplinary Focus, 16 (TASC) Theatre and Social Change, 8 (DP) Directing Program, 19 (TLA) Theatre as a Liberal Art
Session Coordinator: Peter Harrigan, Saint Michael’s College, Vermont Seeing Themselves on Stage: People with Developmental Disabilities visit "The Boys Next Door”
Participants: Pamela Hendrick, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Finding Elizabeth’s Voice: Taking a Holocaust Memoir from Silence to Speech to Stage
Mark Lococo, University of Wisconsin – Waukesha, Synchronicity: Engagement of Community through the Campus Theme, Campus Read, and Campus Production
Ann Shanahan, Loyola University Chicago, "The Laramie Project” prompts "A Loyola Project” on campus Hate and Homophobia

Join four teaching artists as they present their experiences gathering their students, colleagues and communities to address injustice and discuss divisive issues, by producing existing plays or creating new works.

 

 

 


 

 

 



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