Contact Us | Print Page | Sign In | Join
CFPs, publications and other opportunities
Group Home Group Home
Moderator(s):
1
| 2
>
>|
Forum Actions

Topics   Replies Score Author Latest Post
Kurt Weill Foundation Invites Grant Applications for 2017-18 Cycle 0 K. Chisholm Grant funding available in support of excellence in the presentation and study of Kurt Weill's and Marc Blitzstein’s compositions.   The Kurt Weill Foundation for Music is now accepting applications for its 2017 Grant Program. The KWF Grant Program awards financial support worldwide to not-for-profit organizations for performances of musical works by Kurt Weill and Marc Blitzstein, to individuals and not-for-profit organizations for scholarly research pertaining to Kurt Weill, Lotte Lenya, and Marc Blitzstein, and to not-for-profit organizations for relevant educational or scholarly initiatives. Applications are now being accepted for performances and initiatives occurring between 1 January 2017 and 1 July 2018.                                                        Funding is awarded in the following categories:   ·         Professional Performance ·         College/University Performance ·         Media ·         Scholarly Symposia/Conferences; Educational Outreach; Community Engagement ·         Kurt Weill Mentors ·         Kurt Weill Dissertation Fellowship ·         Publication Assistance ·         Research and Travel   All application materials must be received by 1 November 2016 to be considered. Applications for support of major professional productions/festivals/exhibitions, etc. may be evaluated on rolling basis throughout the year.   Sponsorships In addition to its established Grant Program, the Kurt Weill Foundation cultivates relationships with professional arts organizations and leading educational institutions in connection with major projects and initiatives through its Sponsorships program. Organizations may approach the Foundation with ideas for major projects, and the Foundation may on occasion present proposals to the organizations. Collaborative projects are developed through extended discussion between the Foundation and the organizations, and the Foundation provides substantial funding in order to make them possible.   About the Grant Program The grant program was established in the service of the Foundation’s mission to promote and perpetuate the legacies of Weill and Lenya. Upon recommendation of anonymous independent grant panels, the KWF has awarded more than 500 grants and over $3,700,000 to organizations and scholars worldwide since 1983. In 2013, Marc Blitzstein’s compositions became eligible for support.   Complete information, submission instructions, and application and eligibility guidelines may be found at www.kwf.org/grants-a-prizes. Inquiries may be directed to Brady Sansone, Director of Programs and Business Affairs, at bsansone@kwf.org.   About the Kurt Weill Foundation The Kurt Weill Foundation for Music, Inc. (http://www.kwf.org) is dedicated to promoting understanding of the life and works of composer Kurt Weill (1900-1950) and preserving the legacies of Weill and his wife, actress-singer Lotte Lenya (1898-1981). The Foundation administers the Weill-Lenya Research Center, a Grant Program, the Kurt Weill Book Prize and the Lotte Lenya Competition, and publishes the Kurt Weill Edition and the Kurt Weill Newsletter. ###
by K. Chisholm
Thursday, September 1, 2016
CFP: Song, Stage and Screen XI in NYC, June 2016 - REVISED SUBMISSION DATE 0 M. Lodge SONG, STAGE AND SCREEN XI The City College of New York City University of New York June 27-30, 2016   CALL FOR PAPERS   Song, Stage and Screen celebrates the start of its second decade by joining with Music in Gotham in New York City for its annual conference. The Program Committee encourages submissions from scholars and practitioners for presentations that explore all aspects of the musical, both on stage and on screen. Submissions might focus on Broadway or West End musicals, musical films and television shows, international and regional musical theater productions, operas or operetta, vaudeville or variety performances, or any other topic related to the musical. All aspects of performance and production are also welcome, including those that highlight particular song or dance techniques and styles, and those that examine the creators and directors of musical works. Abstracts (300 words maximum) should be submitted to musicingotham@gc.cuny.edu no later than 11:59 p.m., SATURDAY, January 16, 2016, with the subject line SSS XI. Include your name, affiliation, and email address separate from the abstract. Presentations will be scheduled for thirty minutes each, twenty minutes for the paper and ten minutes for discussion.   The program committee includes George Burrows, John Graziano, Mary Jo Lodge, Dominic Symonds, and Elizabeth Wollman.
by M. Lodge
Wednesday, January 13, 2016
Call for Contributions 0 K. Donovan, The University of the Arts Hello MT/D-ers! I hope that everyone is enjoying this wonderful conference. It has been a great pleasure seeing all of our clever, radical, and insightful panels so far. At today's membership meeting we will be presenting a call for contributions for an exciting new project. I'm going to attach the information here so that you can have it to peruse at your leisure both here at the conference as well as back home afterward. Thanks all & see you soon! Kati
by K. Donovan, The University of the Arts
Saturday, August 1, 2015
Edited collection CFP: Adaptation, Awards Culture,and the Value of Prestige 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth Adaptation¨†Awards†Culture¨†and†the†Value†of†Prestige Adaptation studies has recently grown into a vibrant, wideranging field of study. Scholars in literary, media, and cultural studies have used the concepts of adaptation and intertextuality to explore how content negotiates the transition from text to image, image to text, and across media platforms and/or cultures of production and reception. One of the key factors at stake in these intermedial transitions is the question of cultural prestige. As the written word loses ground to the moving image, it retains or even gains prestige as a locus of cultural, aesthetic, and ethical value. In screen studies, the rise of television studies in conjunction with and in contrast to film studies raises similar issues of cultural esteem. Greater critical attention to comics and graphic novels has also presented a challenge to received notions of literary and visual aesthetics. Adaptation across these and other forms is frequently, if not always explicitly, shaped by these perceptions of cultural value, and the rise of cultural prizes, or what James F. English has called the “economy of prestige,” marks one of the clearest (if not always uncontested) declarations of value in the culture industries. Yet this intersection between adaptation and the institutional prestige of awardswhether honoring accomplishment on the page, on the stage, or on various screensremains largely unexplored. Focusing on this intersection of adaptation, awards culture, and notions of value, this collection will address the relationship between literary, cinematic, and other cultural prizes and the process of adapting contemporary texts in and across a variety of media. We invite essays that approach this topic from cultural, social, and textual perspectives, and will consider essays that examine a broad base of prizes and assessments of cultural value, including awards made to authors, directors, artists, creators, performers, etc. involved on either side of the adaptive process. Key questions we wish to consider include: ● How is cultural value encoded into the adaptation process? ● How is value embodied in cinematic, literary, televisual, theatrical, and other cultural texts? ● How do adaptations shape or transform the careers of writers, directors, and performers? ● How does adaptation interact with processes of canonization, both in literature and in other media? ● How are specific textual features on both sides of the adaptation process affected by questions of cultural prestige? ● How have recipients of particular prizes (Nobel, Booker, Pulitzer, Academy Awards, Golden Globes, Emmy, Tony, etc.) been adapted in different media? ● To what extent is prestige transferable across media? Topics to consider include: ● Adapted Screenplay and similar awards ● Television adaptations ● Remakes and reboots ● Auteurism and adaptation ● Performance in adapted works ● Adaptations of serial works ● Genre fiction and adaptation ● Textual and paratextual signifiers of cultural value ● Reception of adapted texts ● Festival awards and adaptation A major academic publisher has expressed preliminary interest in this project. The editors are committed to publishing the volume within a reasonable time frame, and to keeping all contributors fully informed of its progress. Please submit 200300 word abstracts to EricÆSandberg€at›ouluÆfi†AND kenkar€at›bilkentÆeduÆtr†by August 15, 2015. Notice of acceptance will be sent to contributors no later than September 15, and the deadline for full essays (no longer than 6000 words) will be January 25, 2016. About†the†editors Colleen KennedyKarpat is Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication and Design at Bilkent University, Turkey, where she teaches film and media studies. She is the author of Rogues¨†Romance¨†and†Exoticism†in†French†Cinema†of†the†1930s†(2013) and has published essays on Bill Murray and Wes Anderson as well as the selfadapted films of Marjane Satrapi. Eric Sandberg is University Lecturer in Literature at the University of Oulu, Finland. He teaches British and American literature, and works on the twentieth and twentyfirst century novel, genre fiction, and modernism. He is the author of Virginia†Woolf∫†Experiments†in Character†(2014) and has also published on topics ranging from hardboiled detective fiction to the novels of Hilary Mantel.
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Monday, July 6, 2015
Essay collection CFP:Performing Psychologies:Minding The Remembered Present 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth This publication opportunity may be of interest to MTD members (with apologies for cross-posting): ESSAY COLLECTION CALL FOR PROPOSALS   Performing Psychologies: Minding The Remembered Present (working title)   Edited by Pil Hansen, School of Creative and Performing Arts, University of Calgary, CA (Dramaturgy and Cognitive Performance Studies) with Bettina Blaesing, Faculty of Psychology and Sport Sciences, Bielefeld University, GE (Neurocognition and Action – Biomechanics).   This book is the second of two Performing Psychologies volumes, the first of which is edited by Nicola Shaughnessy, University of Kent, UK (Theatre), with Philip Barnard, University of Cambridge, UK (Neuroscience) on the topic of imagination and other minds.   We invite proposals from scholars, researcher-practitioners, and scientists working between the performing arts and cognitive sciences on the subject of processes of memory in dance, theatre, or music performance.   The aim of this essay collection is twofold: (1) discuss how performing arts practices strategically target cognitive processes of human memory and (2) present insights into memory that derive from the study of such practices.   In recent years, a growing number of cognitive scientists study memory through experiments with performance subjects; at the same time, the number of artists that make use of cognitive memory studies and theory to develop creation approaches and lines of artistic inquiry is also increasing. A shift from a general understanding of memory as archived and retrievable information to a cognitive conception of long-term memory as a reconstructive process, involving our active engagement with our surroundings in the present, changes the possible avenues of working through memory in performance. In turn, cognitive scientists working with performing arts cases discover that performers’ advanced learning, memorization, and retrieval abilities depend on a complex combination of multisensory perceptions, articulations, and clues that question more classical concepts of memory. Scientists are motivated to advance the ability to study complex dynamics of artistic practice and artists are looking beyond broad concepts of intuition, presence, and cultural memory towards more detailed and precise cognitive understandings.   This volume will map, articulate, and support the continued realization of the possibilities identified by this rich field of reciprocal exchange between the performing arts and cognitive sciences. Contributors are encouraged to consider, but not be restricted by, the following topics when forming proposals:   ·         Entrainment in performance as a source of joint/collective memory construction and retrieval ·         The role of trained, implicit memory in entrainment and improvisation ·         Performing arts training as a form of cross-modal perceptual specialization embedded in procedural and implicit memory ·         Performers’ stage presence as a mode of perceptual attention that prioritizes working memory processes ·         Expansion of working memory capacity through performing arts practices ·         Creative strategies and “impossible tasks” that aim to hinder reliance on implicit memory (skills and habits) in an attempt to create something new ·         The cognitive advantages of using marking and other forms of physicalized or sounded memory recall when reflecting upon compositional options ·         Creative approaches that make strategic use of declarative and explicit memory for memorization, to access source materials, or to activate performance tasks, rules, and structures. ·         Neuroplasticity and creative strategies for the adaptation of autobiographical memory ·         Performance as a mediator between cognitive processes of memory and external archives, records, and notations ·         Strategies for expanding, synchronizing, or hindering spectators’ processes of memory in ways that relate to the strategies used by performers   We welcome abstracts (400 – 500 words) on a broad range of approaches to these and related topics. Proposals are to be submitted by June 1st, 2015. First drafts will be due no later than October 1, 2015, and final versions of the chapters will be due on March 1st, 2016.   Note that priority will be given to proposals that either 1) are based on methodologically defined empirical cases, experiments, or practice-based research or 2) present hypothetical proposals that build on reviews of such studies. While selected authors will be invited to write in the language of their respective disciplines, some additional introduction of central concepts and presentation of research methods used will be requested in order to achieve interdisciplinary accessibility.   Please send submissions and questions to both Pil Hansen and Bettina Blaesing at pil.hansen@ucalgary.ca and bettina.blaesing@uni-bielefeld.de  
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Tuesday, April 14, 2015
Studies in Musical Theatre CFP: "New Music Theatre – work in/and progress" 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth Call for Papers / Expressions of Interest   New Music Theatre – work in/and progress [working title], Special Issue Studies in Musical Theatre, Intellect (guest edited by David Roesner, LMU Munich)   In 2016 the international new music theatre festival, the Munich Biennale (28 May-9 June), will be curated and led by two new artistic directors, Daniel Ott and Manos Tsangaris. One of their key decisions has been to instigate an elaborate process of international ‘platforms’, designed to spot and nurture talent, to establish artistic networks and collaborations and to actively stimulate and interact with the development of new work from an early stage. Elsewhere, other festivals such as Grimeborn (UK), Tȇte à Tȇte (UK) and Prototype (US) play a similar role in developing new work.   This special issue of Studies in Musical Theatre will focus on the question of how new work is developed not through straightforward commissions, but through festivals and cross-institutional collaborations. Two key current research dynamics intersect for this proposal: first, an increasing body of literature about new and experimental music theatre, which seeks to interrogate its aesthetic conditions, genre conventions and the interplays of text, music, movement, voice, form and stage (Goebbels 2015; Hiekel 2011; Reininghaus & Schneider 2004; Rebstock & Rosener 2012; Salzman & Desi 2008; Sanio 1999; Schläder 2009); second, the emergence of what Josette Féral has called ‘genetic research’: investigating and analysing creation and rehearsal processes of theatrical production, which to some degree also entails questions about devising and /or practice as research (Féral 2008; Freeman 2003; Govan 2007; Harvie & Lavender 2010; Hinz & Roselt 2011; McAuley 1998, 2012; Mitter 1992; Nelson 2013; Radosavljević 2013; Smart & Mermikides 2009).   Key questions to be explored might include: ·         How do development processes of new work impact on the results? ·         What ethics and aesthetics are implicit or explicit in these processes? ·         How do curators help negotiate cross-disciplinary and cross-national communication? ·         How are different cultural backgrounds and artistic abilities made productive? ·         How can a shared sense of quality and of what is ‘new’ be achieved? ·         How does technology (of communication, of production, of notation, of sound/video) impact on the development of new work? ·         What challenges does new music theatre and its experimental development pose to relevant academic disciplines – which methods can be developed to meet these challenges?   Abstract proposals for this special issue should demonstrate an active engagement with the question of process and a sense of how to observe, evaluate and analyse it. The on-going platforms for the Biennale, for example, may provide an excellent opportunity for participant observations, interviews, documentation etc., and the artistic directors have indicated their enthusiasm to collaborate with contributors to this issue. Further platforms in Munich, Berne, Buenos Aires, Beijing, Tokyo and Melbourne may offer similar opportunities. Proposals relating to other festivals / new work are equally welcome.   Abstracts of 300-500 words should be submitted by 15 May 2015; those selected will then be developed into full drafts of 5-6000 words for a deadline of 1 September 2016, for anonymous peer-review. The special issue will be published in mid 2017.   Submissions and questions to Prof. David Roesner, d.roesner@lrz.uni-muenchen.de, Tel.: 0049 89 2180 5685
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Wednesday, April 1, 2015
Summer Institute Cologne - December 31 deadline! 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth [sic!] Summer Institute Cologne – Aug 24 - Sep 4, 2015       [Intermingling]  http://sic.phil-fak.uni-koeln.de/15174.html   EXTENDED DEADLINE: 31 DECEMBER 2014       Cologne University’s international interdisciplinary Summer Institute [sic!] 2015 will take place from 24th to 4th of September, 2015 at the Theaterwissenschaftliche Sammlung on Schloss Wahn*. Participants and faculty of [sic!] 2015 will explore perspectives on “Intermingling.” We invite graduate and postgraduate students from Art History, English, German, History, Media, Film, Sound, Theatre, Performance, Classics, Cultural Studies, Literary Studies and related fields to apply for our international program. There will be five seminars – each led by a pair of scholars from Northwestern University (Evanston, USA) and the University of Cologne (Germany) – in the fields of Classic, the Early Modern, Theatre, Film, and Sound. In addition to the seminars, [sic!] offers interdisciplinary academic workshops that allow for a dialogue with participants from across the seminars. Each participant can choose one seminar and one workshop, thus composing an individual study program. Seminars and workshops are enhanced by study trips, evening lectures by faculty, and poster presentations by students.   All sessions will be conducted in English.   When Lévi-Strauss distinguished the bricoleur and the scientist by their differing attitude towards taxonomy, order, and clarity, he implicitly called for the ideal of tinkering – working with found materials, accepting the lack of homogeneity, the heterogeneity of material and concepts, and the visible seams and fragments in our argumentation. [sic!] 2015 focuses on “Intermingling” – this ever-happening but rarely mentioned phenomenon – with respect to our materials but also to our concepts and methods. With “Intermingling,” [sic!] 2015 proposes a term which is similar to concepts of interculturalism, intermediality, hybridity, and interstices yet also different from them. “Intermingling” is not meant as a new concept, rather it shall be used as a tool by scholars and students from diverse fields to join a dialogue about patchworks, differences, heterogeneity, influences, transfer, and ‘odd’ knowledge.       The fee is 200.00 Euro, deadline for applications is December 15, 2014.**       * Schloss Wahn dates back to the 14th century. Unfortunately, the old infrastructure of the building does not allow us (yet) to accommodate all disabilities. If you need further information, please send us an e-mail (sascha.forster(at)uni-koeln.de) prior to your application.   **The fee is waived for Northwestern students.
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Monday, December 29, 2014
CFP CONTINUUM:The Journal of African/Diaspora Drama, Theatre & Performance 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth CALL FOR PAPERS, REVIEWS AND PHOTOGRAPHSBlack Theatre Network, a national organization of theatre scholars and practitioners, is pleased to announce its call for papers for the next edition of its online scholarly refereed journal, CONTINUUM:  The Journal of African/Diaspora Drama, Theatre and Performance.  CONTINUUM links the past, present and future of scholarly inquiry into the history, theory and criticism that serves our discipline.  Our inaugural issue launched in June 2014. The anticipated publication for the next edition (2.1) is June 2015.Though the journal is interested in any topic relevant to African and African diaspora drama, theatre and performance, there is a special interest in articles that address the special historical resonances of the year 2015:  the sesquicentennial of the end of the Civil War; one of the centennial years of World War I;  the hundredth anniversary of the film, “Birth of a Nation,” seventy years since the end of World War II; fifty years since the assassination of Malcom X and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.   In light of recent horrific acts of police violence against Black men and boys, there is also a special urgency in the subject of civil rights and civil liberties.   Submissions should be no longer than 6250-6500 words in length and follow Chicago Manual of Style formatting.  An abstract of up to 250 words should accompany the manuscript.  Electronic submission instructions and a brief submission form can be found at www.continuumjournal.org.  Our deadline submission date is February 28, 2015. Our journal does not publish plays. Call for reviews.   Reviews of books on any aspect of African diaspora drama, theatre, and performance  and reviews of relevant productions mounted during the 2014-2015 season should also be submitted for consideration.  Reviews should be up to 1250 words in length; reviewers should follow the same electronic submission instructions listed above.   Call for photographs.  As a continuing feature, we publish production photographs; we will accept up to four photographs each from productions mounted during the 2014-2015 theatre season.  Please follow the instructions for submission of photographs on our web site. The executive editorial board of CONTINUUM includes Dr. Harry Elam, Stanford University; Dr. Paul Bryant-Jackson, Miami University of Ohio; Dr. Sandra Shannon, Howard University; and Dr. Beth Turner, Florida A&M University, who will serve as lead editor on our next issue.  Dr. Sandra Addell of the University of Wisconsin serves as our book review editor; Ms. Rebekah Pierce, founder of the Pierce Agency LLC, is our production review editor.  Dr. Freda Scott Giles, University of Georgia (Emerita), is managing editor. For further information, please contact Freda Scott Giles through the CONTINUUM web site:  www.continuumjournal.org.
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Sunday, December 14, 2014
TDPT Special issue CFP: Showing and Writing Training 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth Theatre, Dance and Performance Training (TDPT) Special issue entitled Showing and Writing Training to be published July 2016 Call for contributions, ideas, proposals and dialogue with the editor Guest editor: Mary Paterson (Independent Writer: marypaterson@gmail.com ) Background and context This will be the fifth special Issue of Theatre, Dance and Performance Training, following issues on sport, Michael Chekhov, politics and ideology and Moshe Feldenkrais. Our special issues do not necessarily follow the form and structure of generic issues of TDPT and we are open to adapting our shape and appearance to the material received. This special issue of TDPT is concerned as much with form as it is with content.  We are interested in the ways that discourse and dialogue about training affect not only training and its stated aims, but also the ways in which these methods and devices are accessed, remembered or reproduced.  In short, we want to show training as well as write it. In a still primarily paper-based journal concerned with training in Theatre, Dance and Performance – broad terms for practices that very much concern bodies in motion and in relation to space – contributions tend to come up very quickly against the limits of written language in general and those modes of writing in particular that are the norms of academic literacy. Apart from words, the main other mode used in TDPT has been the still photograph, usually reproduced in black and white. The problem, if such it is, is not new and has long been recognised in attempts to represent and critique the specificity of performance in words. We believe that there may be a distinction between attention to the singularities of specific instances of training practice and attempts to discuss genres, types or categories. The term training may always imply that any instance of training has its place in a method or system. Since methods are often set out in words, this may reduce the problem but it is unlikely to be the written descriptions of methods on their own that lead witnesses to recognise the programmatic affiliations of any live example. Expressions of interest We are particularly interested in submissions that explore the function of the journal as a tool for training, for example by considering the way the journal is designed, the use of image, and the disruption of academic language and/or crossovers with the digital realm (an area we hope to extend for TDPT in the next year).  We want this special issue to confront the constraints of translating training narratives from the studio to the (virtual or paper) page and invite expressions of interest through one or more of the following approaches: •       articles that examine examples of the existing literature on this topic; •       articles that take a conceptual and/or formalist approach to the perceived limits (as a possible example, a consideration of the extent to which phenomenological approaches have in any respects successfully addressed the problem); •       articles that consider examples of writings that have attempted to address and perhaps transcend the problem; •       articles which explicitly cross disciplines and art forms, or which play with the accepted  boundaries between them; •       experimental writings that demonstrate or test alternatives; •       interviews with practitioners and artists who have wrestled with issues of ‘showing and telling’; •       essays that are wholly or in part non-verbal and which explore the possibilities of the visual image in all its multiple manifestations. We welcome submissions from people both inside and outside academic institutions and from those who are currently undergoing training or who have experiences to tell from their training histories. As part of our own interest in the subject, we are exploring ways that the normal peer review system can be revised to accommodate more experimental approaches to the journal article. Questions to consider include •       What is the difference between what you do and how you talk about what you do? •       Who is unwelcome and how do they know? •       What remains unsaid? What remains undone? What gets undone? •       Would you say all this to someone you are training with? •       What kinds of discourses are (in)credible? •       What have you already assumed? •       What is impossible to explain? •       What can only be known in retrospect? •       How does it feel? •       What kind of person is produced by this process and how will they talk? •       What is (in)substantial? •       What will change if we do things the same way we talk about them? What will happen if we don’t? •       What will change if we don’t change anything that we’re doing right now? •       What is impossible to articulate in words? •       What are the secrets of your method? •       How do you know you belong somewhere? •       Who do you think you are talking to? To signal your interest and intention to make a contribution to this special issue in any one of the ways identified above please email an abstract (max 250 words) to Mary Paterson at:                 marypaterson@gmail.com  Our first deadline for these is 31st January 2015. Training Grounds: we will also be seeking contributions for the Training Grounds section of this special issue. Within TDPT, Training Grounds represents a playful space for shorter and perhaps more provocative and rhetorical contributions. Thus in our generic issues we have postcards (Training and …), responses to an ‘answer the question’, essais and reviews of events, workshops, conferences as well as books. Our Training Grounds section in special issues does not always follow this model but please contact Mary Paterson if you have ideas or would like to discuss possibilities with her. Approximate timelines 31 January 2015: abstracts and proposals sent to Mary Paterson End March 2015: Response from editor and, if successful, invitation to submit contribution April to mid September 2015: writing/preparation period for writers, artists etc. Mid Sept to end October: peer review period November 2015 – end January 2016: author revisions post peer review End March 2016: most articles into production with Routledge April- June 2016: typesetting, proofing, revises, editorial etc. July 2016: publication.    
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Sunday, December 14, 2014
ATDS John W. Frick Book Award (15 Feb. 2015) 0 A. Hughes, Brooklyn College (CUNY) ATDS John W. Frick Book Award for the Best Book in American Theatre and Drama published in 2014     Deadline: February 15, 2015   Purpose: The American Theatre and Drama Society’s John W. Frick Book Award honors the best monograph published each year on American theatre and/or performance, recognizing that notions of “America” and the United States encompass migrations of peoples and cultures that overlap and influence one another. The award recipient will receive a cash prize of $200 and be recognized at the annual ATDS membership meeting at the ATHE Conference (July 30-August 2, 2015, in Montreal). For more information about ATDS, visit http://www.atds.org.   Evaluation and eligibility: Books will be evaluated on the basis of originality, critical rigor, and contribution to the field of American theatre and drama. Books must exhibit a copyright date of 2014. Edited collections, anthologies, and plays are not eligible.   Nominations: The author, the publisher, or any member of ATDS may submit nominations.             Submissions: Please submit 1 copy of the book each to:   1. Amy E. Hughes (Chair, Frick Award Committee), Department of Theater, Brooklyn College, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11210   2. James Fisher, 3516 Regents Park Lane, Greensboro, NC 27455   3. Ariel Nereson, Vassar College, 124 Raymond Avenue, Box 598, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604   4. Harvey Young, Interdisciplinary PhD Program in Theatre and Drama, Northwestern University, The Wirtz Center, 1949 Campus Drive, Room 215A, Evanston, IL 60208-2430   Questions? Please contact Dr. Amy E. Hughes at hughes@brooklyn.cuny.edu.   Notification: The award recipient will be notified by May 1, 2015.     Dr. Amy E. Hughes Associate Professor, Theater History & Criticism Deputy Chair for Graduate Studies, Dept. of Theater Brooklyn College, 2900 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY  11210 718.951.5000 x2767 // hughes@brooklyn.cuny.edu Author of Spectacles of Reform: Theater and Activism in Nineteenth-Century America: http://goo.gl/NIAGU Co-editor, A Player and a Gentleman (critical/digital edition of the Harry Watkins Diary): http://goo.gl/r3k9e Bio and CV:  http://goo.gl/SNUAe
by A. Hughes, Brooklyn College (CUNY)
Tuesday, December 9, 2014
ITHACA COLLEGE DISSERTATION DIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth   2015-2016  The School of Humanities and Sciences at Ithaca College announces the Dissertation Diversity Fellowship Program for 2015-16. The fellowships support promising scholars who are committed to diversity in the academy in order to better prepare them for tenure track appointments within liberal arts or comprehensive colleges/universities. Applications are welcome in the following areas/departments: Communication Studies, History, Philosophy, Religion, Sociology, Theatre Arts, Writing, and Women’s and Gender Studies. The School of Humanities and Sciences houses additional interdisciplinary minors that may be potential sites of collaboration for candidates: African Diaspora Studies, Latina/o Studies, Jewish Studies, Latin American Studies, Asian American Studies, Muslim Cultures, Native American Studies and Women's Studies.  Position Responsibilities and Terms of Fellowship: Fellowships are for the academic year (August 16, 2015 to May 31, 2016) and are non-renewable. The fellow will receive a $32,000 stipend, $3,000 in travel/professional development support, relocation reimbursement, office space, health benefits and access to Ithaca College and Cornell University libraries. The fellow will teach one course in the fall semester and one course in the spring semester, and will be invited to speak about her/his dissertation research in relevant classes and at special events at Ithaca College. Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited program leading to a Ph.D. degree at a U.S. institution; evidence of superior academic achievement and commitment to a career in teaching at the college or university level is required. Candidates must also be authorized to work in the United States. Prior to August 15, 2015, the fellow must be advanced to candidacy at the home institution, with an approved dissertation proposal. Preference will be given to candidates in the last year of dissertation writing.  Position/Job Qualifications: Successful candidates will show evidence of superior academic achievement, a high degree of promise for continued achievement as scholars and teachers, and a capacity to respond in pedagogically productive ways to the learning needs of students from diverse backgrounds. Candidates should demonstrate sustained personal engagement with communities that are underrepresented in the academy and an ability to bring this asset to learning, teaching and scholarship at the college and university level. Using the diversity of human experience as an educational resource in teaching and scholarship is expected.  Ithaca College, a comprehensive residential campus community of 7,000 students, combines the best of education in the liberal arts and sciences with training in the professions. Our strategic plan, called IC 20/20, positions us to offer a truly distinct integrative learning experience that allows us to graduate students who are ready for today's personal, professional and global challenges. We seek candidates who embrace integrative learning and want to be a part of this exciting time in Ithaca College history. Ithaca College continually strives to build an inclusive and welcoming community of individuals, with diverse talents and skills from a multitude of backgrounds, who are committed to civility, mutual respect, social justice, and the free and open exchange of ideas. Candidates from underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. Nestled in the heart of New York State's scenic Finger Lakes region, Ithaca College sits atop South Hill overlooking picturesque Cayuga Lake and is just minutes away from the city center. Combining small town warmth and charm with the vibrancy of a college community, the thriving and culturally diverse city of Ithaca has been rated by Kiplinger's as one of the top 10 places to live in the U.S. To learn more about Ithaca College, visit us at www.ithaca.edu.  Instructions for submitting your application: Interested individuals should apply online at www.icjobs.org, and submit a C.V./resumé, cover letter, two sample syllabi for courses you might wish to teach, a list of references, and a transcript. Questions about the online application should be directed to the Office of Human Resources at (607) 274-8000.  Screening of applications begins December 15, 2014. 
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Monday, November 24, 2014
The Mellon School of Theater and Performance Research at Harvard University 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth The Mellon School of Theater and Performance Research at Harvard University is pleased to announce that we are now accepting applications for our fifth annual summer session, to be held June 1st - 12th, 2015. The School offers faculty and advanced graduate students the opportunity to learn from leading scholars in theater and performance research in an intensive two-week summer program. The topic for the 2015 session will be "What Gets Performed? The Life of the Dramatic Repertoire." The 2015 summer session is devoted to a broad range of topics including canon formation, anthologies, and the rise and fall of dramatic literature traditions as well as the role of dramaturgy, new play development, and the changing function of theater as an institution crucial to the life of the dramatic repertoire. Which plays and canons are exemplary and which, eccentric? How do global canons emerge and function? What role does the institution of theater play in the shaping of the dramatic repertoire? And how do newer theatrical institutions such as galleries and museums influence what gets performed? Finally, we hope to explore the future of the dramatic repertoire and its relation to the changing landscape of theater pedagogy outside and inside of the university. The latter topic is an especially urgent one here at Harvard University, where a new program in theater, dance, and media is being developed with an anticipated opening date of fall 2015, but we expect that all of these questions will be relevant across the field.   Participants will work with an international faculty of distinguished scholars in theater studies. This year's faculty includes: Minou Arjomand (Boston University) Debra Caplan (Baruch College - CUNY) Sharon Marcus (Columbia University) Ryan McKittrick (American Repertory Theater) Carrie Preston (Boston University) Marc Robinson (Yale University) Magda Romanska (Emerson College) Matthew Smith (Stanford University) Andrew Sofer (Boston College) Diana Taylor (New York University) William Worthen (Barnard College)   Participants will take one of two daily seminars on overarching theoretical and methodological topics related to the theme of "What Gets Performed?" In addition to the morning seminars, the program includes discussions, research workshops, performances, and evening lectures taught by visiting faculty members. Graduate student participants take part in a writing workshop devoted to their dissertation research; junior faculty participate in a workshop focused on turning their dissertations into books. Due to a generous grant from the Mellon Foundation, tuition will be free for all accepted participants. Applications are due Sunday, March 1, 2015. A complete application consists of our application form, a curriculum vitae, graduate transcripts (for current doctoral students only), a statement of interest, and a research statement. Admissions decisions will be announced in early April, 2015. For more information and application instructions. please visit our website at thschool.fas.harvard.edu or email thschool@fas.harvard.edu. Please forward this announcement widely to interested colleagues. Martin Puchner, Director The Mellon School for Theater and Performance Research at Harvard University
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
CFP Song, Stage and Screen X: “The Star System in Musical Theatre and Film" 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth Call for PapersSong, Stage and Screen X: “The Star System in Musical Theatre and Film”Regent’s University LondonJune 24-26, 2015 “star”synonyms: celebrity, big name, celeb (informal), megastar, name, draw, idol, luminary, leading man or lady, lead, hero or heroine, principal, main attraction                                                                                                                 (Collins Dictionary)  The entertainment industry has always relied extensively upon the lure and sales potential of star­dom; not for nothing did MGM boast in the 1930s to have “More Stars Than There Are In Heaven”. Yet it seems that the whole concept of the larger-than-life artistic persona is especially potent and relevant when it comes to the stage and film musical:  Certain film cycles are exclusively identified by their stars (Mickey Rooney & Judy Garland; Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers), not by their directors. Certain stage roles (Harold Hill, Mama Rose, Fanny Brice) are always expected to be performed by star actors. There also is a particular fascination with the artist trying to make it in show business (42nd Street; A Star is Born; Funny Girl) and, converse­ly, with the fading star (A Star is Born; Applause; Follies; Sunset Boulevard).The producers and artists working on film and stage musicals – whether conscious of doing so or not – are responsible for setting up and reinforcing the mechanisms that encourage an audience’s emotional affinity and identification with certain performers and their roles.Song, Stage and Screen X aims to explore these mechanisms and what they signify.The following are a few suggested topics for papers and presentations:Star qualityCreating starsThe star personaSelling starsEmploying starsDepicting stars Papers should be designed to last no more than 20 minutes.Please send an abstract of no more than 200 words for blind peer review (your name should not appear anywhere in the proposal) to the conference convenor, Dr Olaf Jubin, jubino@regents.ac.uk with the subject heading “Song, Stage and Screen X”.The deadline for proposals is Saturday, January 31, 2015.
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Wednesday, November 12, 2014
CFP: New England Theatre Journal 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth New England Theatre Journal  Call for Papers   New England Theatre Journal (a publication of the New England Theatre Conference) invites submissions for its year 2015 edition. A refereed publication, New England Theatre Journal is concerned with advancing the study and practice of theatre and drama by printing articles of the highest quality on a broad range of subjects, including traditional scholarship, performance theory, pedagogy, and articles on theatre performance, design and technology.   New England Theatre Journal is indexed in the International Index of the Performing Arts and the MLA Bibliography.   The deadline for submissions is January 20, 2015. You are, however, encouraged to submit contributions at the earliest possible date so that full consideration may be given to them.   Inquiries and communications regarding the submission of articles are welcome.   MANUSCRIPTS All contributions should conform to the following guidelines: 1.                  Three copies should be submitted, between 15-30 pages in length. Author’s name should not appear on manuscript pages. ALSO, please send a version as an email attachment to the address listed below.   2.                  The latest edition of the MLA Handbook should be followed strictly.   3.                  Include a cover sheet with the title of the article, your name, your affiliation, title, mailing address, telephone numbers and email address, a 50-75 word abstract, and a brief biographical paragraph.   4.                  Notes, references, charts, or figures should appear at the end of the article on separate pages.   Articles pending disposition by NETJ should not be submitted to another publication unless released by the Editor of NETJ. Manuscripts will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed envelope with sufficient postage. Manuscripts are juried anonymously in order to assure the highest possible publication standards.   Manuscripts should be sent by January 20th to: Stuart J. Hecht, Editor New England Theatre Journal Department of Theatre Robsham Theatre Arts Center Boston College Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 Ph. 617/552-4612 Email: hecht@bc.edu   (See reverse for Subscription and Back Issue Order Information.) New England Theatre Journal SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUE ORDER INFORMATION Volume 25 (2014): (available in December, 2014) Felicia Hardison Londre, “Sarah Bernhardt’s Last Stand in America: How the One-Legged Actress Promoted American involvement in the Great War” Nicole Berkin, “The Margins of Celebrity Tours: Starring Junius Brutus Booth and Edwin Forrest” Maya Cantu, “’Good Enough for Grandma’: Nostalgia, Utopia and Social Progress in Bloomer Girl” Stephen Graf, “You Call this ‘Freedom’?: The Fight to Publish and Produce Samuel Beckett’s First Full-length Play” Joseph Falocco, “’Shakespeare has it both ways’: Character and form in Performance and Criticism” ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Volume 24 (2013): Rosemarie Bank, “Arbiters of National Culture: Newspapers, Thomas S. Hamblin, the Bowery Theatre, and the Miss Missouri Affair” Fonzie D. Geary II, “Love and…Marriage?:  Maxwell Anderson’s Advice to ‘Saturday’s Children’ Regarding the Marriage Crisis in America” Kristen Rogers, “Cheryl Crawford: Broadway’s Unsung Hero or Method’s Martyr?” John H. Houchin, Robert Macbeth, the New Lafayette Theatre, and the Politics of Art in the 1960s Matthew McMahan, “’We are your masters’: Encroachment of the Other in Marivaux” Diana Manole, “The Post-Communist Revenge Parody: Embodying Nicolae Ceausescu on Stage after 1989” Volume 23 (2012): Odai Johnson, “Heart of Oak: Making America, Esquiring Actors, and Other Transatlantic Transactions” Joe Falocco, “Tomasso Salvini’s Othello and Racial Identity in Late Nineteenth-Century America”*WINNER OF ATDS 2012 VERA MOWRY ROBERTS AWARD for BEST SCHOLARLY ARTICLE OF THE YEAR Vessela S. Warner, “The Economies of Communism: Georgi Markov and Bulgarian Theatre in the 1960s” John Patrick Bray, “Playwright as Auteur, Playwright as Producer: The Economics and Aesthetics of the Twentieth-First Century American Playwright” Plus a special subsection on Chicago theatre and community: Arvid Sponberg, “Introduction to Essays on Chicago Theatre: Some Background” Megan E. Geigner, “’The World in Miniature’: Nationality Performed in the Columbian Exposition and Chicago Immigrant Theatre” Debra Caplan, “Heymish Modernism: Joseph Buloff’s Chicago Revaluation of the American Yiddish Theatre Terry McCabe, “Onstage at the Creation: The Role of Clergy in the Early Off-Loop Theatre Movement”__________________________________________________________________               Volume 22 (2011): Fonzie D. Geary II, “A Plague on Both Your Houses: Mr. Anderson Goes to Washington” Anne Fletcher and Cheryl Black, “The Color of Revolution: Race Trumps Class in Theatre Union’s Stevedore, 1934” Lisa Jackson-Schebetta, “Repertoires of the Astruian Diaspora: the Latin Unit’s Production of Eso no puede ocurrir aqui in Ybor City” Kate Roark, “The Yankee-mad Stage: Stage Yankees and Slavery in the 1820s” La Donna L. Forsgren, “Militancy and Ministry: Revolutionary Conversion in Ben Caldwell’s Prayer Meeting and James Baldwin’s Blues for Mister Charlie” Darren Blaney, “Queering the Domestic and Domesticating the Queer: Utopian Genealogies in Lanford Wilson’s Fifth of July” James Dennen, “Agenda and Ideology in the Output of Carlo Gozzi” ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Volume 21 (2010): John H. Frick on violence in: Uncle Tom’s Cabin; Michelle Granshaw, on Jon H. Nichols’s early American political plays; Chukwuma Okoye,on African Theatre in Performance Laura Macdonald on Commercialism and  the American Musical, Cigdem Usekes on James Baldwin in Turkey; Bethany Wood on Alice Dunbar-Nelson’s Mine Eyes Have Seen and The Crisis’ and Black masculinity; Nancy Houfek on a voice teacher’s journey toward teaching” ______________________________________________________________________________   Highlights of past issues include: Volume 20 (2009): Clifford Ashby on Greek Audiences at the Tragedies; Dan Decker and Stephen Denning, on the roots of Shakespeare’s sonnets; Scott W. Malia, on mistaken identity in Goldoni’s The Villeggiatura Trilogy; Nancy Nanney, on the Contemporary English Stage in Malaysia” Plus a special subsection on Undergraduate Research and Theatre: Nancy Hensel, Introductory comments Nancy Kindelan, “Informed Imagination: The Pedagogies and Strategies of Theatre Studies” ·         case studies by Cary M. Mazer (Miss Julie at U of Penn), Robyn Quick (dramaturgy as 21st century pedagogy) and Jennifer Blacker (the Human Faustus Project). Volume 19b (2008): Ryan Claycomb on Metatheatre and Feminist Retellings; Joy D. Richmond on Women and Land in Irish Peasant Plays; Sarah Marsh on Microscopes and Magnification in  Man of Mode; Theresa K. Smalek’s transcript of Spalding Gray’s last interview; Jeffrey B. Loomis on Tennessee Williams’ Not About Nightingales. Volume 19a (2008) Special Issue: August Wilson Celebrated:  Monica White Ndounou on Wilson’s “Nice-Nasty” politics; Aaron Bryant on Ethnography in The Piano Lesson; Soyica Diggs Colbert on Middle Passage reparations found in Joe Turner’s Come and Gone; Richard Noggle on Wilson’s use of history and memory; Heather Nathans’ visualizing Gem of the Ocean, plus an interview with director Kenny Leon. Volume 18 (2007): Barry Witham on Percy Hammond and Historiography; Luc Gilleman on Saved; DeAnna Toten Beard on Pre-WWI’s New Stagecraft; Joe Falocco on Granville Barker; Katherine Weiss on Shepard’s masculinity; David Radavich on Shepard’s God of Hell. Volume 17 (2006): John Frick on The Contrast as Urban Drama; Celia Braxon on The Drunkard’s domesticity; Sharon Friedman on Glaspell and the intimacy; Catherine Diamond on Justice in China vs the West; Ron West on Japanese Internment Camp performance; Roger Bechtel on Mamet’s Bobby Gould as a righteous man. Volume 16 (2005): Adrienne Macki on Anna Cora Mowatt’s use of space; David Krasner on Sheppard Randolph Edmonds; Andrew White on Arthur Penn; four articles dealing with Diaspora Studies: Heather Nathans’s overview; Yana Meerzon on performing diaspora in Greek tragedy; Freda Scott Giles on diaspora and black drama; Aoife Monks on performing diaspora through St. Patrick Day parades. Volume 15 (2004): Amy Hughes on Antebellum temperance drama and Christian views of Leisure; Terry Stoller on making The Laramie Project; Melson Ritschel on Synge’s impact on Shaw; Jo Fallocco on Shaw’s John Bull’s Other Island; Theresa May on Ecology and Willy Loman; Judith Sebesta on musicals and the military. Volume 14 (2003): Karine Schaefer on David Hare’s Via Dolorosa; Sarah Lansdale Stevenson on Lisa Kron’s 2.5 Minute Ride; Ed Menta on the La MaMa International Directors Symposium; William Grange on German actress Marianne Hoppe; Val Robinson Hohman on Morris Gest and American Theatre; Robert Lloyd Neblett on song in Caryl Churchill’s Vinegar Tom. Volume 13 (2002): Rebecca Groves on theatrical ghosts in Wellman’s Crowbar; Patrick Finelli on art theatre & digital archives; Jonathan Chambers on Iizuka’s Skin; Michael Schiavi on post-Stonewall men & musical theatre; Andrea Nouryeh on 1930s African American women playwrights. Volume 12 (2001): John Somers & Heather Cousins on Theatre & Health Education; Sherry Engle on American women dramatists; Thomas Walsh on the rise of the Dramatist Guild; Michael Chemers on performing Tom Thumb; Weldon Durham on playwright James Sheridan Knowles, Paul Malone on Stoppard’s Hapgood; Melissa Gibson on 1980s London stage; Caldwell Titcomb interviews critic Elliot Norton. Volume 11 (2000): Heather Nathans on Federalism’s battles & 18th c. Boston theatres; Olga Barrios on apartheid’s Black South African Theatre; Catherine Diamond on the Chinese Hongniang into confidante; Arthur Horowitz on medieval Italian festivals; Thomas A. Pallen translates Mangini on 16th c. Italy’s public theatres; James Fisher on fools in 20th c. Italian drama. Volume 10 (1999): Frank Hildy on performance at Shakespeare’s Globe; Odai Johnson on anti- theatre in Colonial Boston newspapers; John Houchin on anti-theatrical in 18th c. Boston; John Frick on reform in early 19th c. American dramas; Mark Mullen on symbolic appropriation in Metamora; Janet E. Gardner on redefining Feminism in Top Girls. Volume 9 (1998): Rosemarie Bank on performance at Brook Farm; Beth Cleary on Bread and Puppet Theatre; Patrick Julian on FDR in a musical; Rob K. Baum on gender in Peter Pan. Volume 8 (1997): Arnold Aronson on future theatre technology; Bruce McConachie on national theatre history; Stephen J. Bottoms on Forne’s Promenade; James Fisher on Edy Craig’s stage management career. Volume 7 (1996): David Carlyon on rube story as crowd control; Geraldine Maschio on George W. Monroe; Susan Kattwinkel on feminism and Victorianism in Glaspell’s plays; Robert F. Gross on history and histrionics in Strindberg’s Christina. Volume 6 (1995): John Frick on staging Scottsboro; William Grange on Nazi use of theatre; John Houchin on Mose as a working-class stage hero. Volume 5 (1994): Hilliker on Piscator and Grosz; Jennifer Jones on Gregory Mosher’s Our Town; John Stewig on drama and Whole Language; Bonnie Raphael’s guide to voice & speech training. Volume 4 (1993): McConachie; Sarratore; Kindelan; Woods. Limited supply. Volume 3 (1992): Schechner; Marra; Larrabee; Koger; Klein. Limited supply. Volume 2 (1991): Dukore: Hirschfield; Ruff. Limited supply. Volume 1 (1990): Gainor: Wegner; Grange; Very limited supply   Does your library carry NETJ? Back issues available ($20 per) from New England Theatre Conference, Inc., c/o 215 Knob Hill Drive, Hamden, CT 06518; www.netconline.org   Plus, our annual Review of Books and Review of each New England Professional Theatre season.            
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Sunday, October 26, 2014
Theatre Annual: A Journal of Theatre and Performance of the Americas 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth Call for Papers  2015 Issue   Theatre Annual is the oldest theatre periodical continuously published in America. With the 2015 volume, the journal marks a shift to a new focus and a new affiliation.  Re-subtitled “A Journal of Theatre and Performance of the Americas,” Theatre Annual is now an official publication of the American Theatre and Drama Society.  We construe “American” broadly to include North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean Islands.  Articles may treat work in these geographic areas; it may also treat work from these areas that is presented elsewhere in the world. Within this scope, we welcome articles on the history and ethnography of performance, drawing from such areas as theatre studies, performance studies, popular culture, music, anthropology, communication, dance, philosophy, folklore, history, and the special areas of interest that cross disciplinary lines.  Please note that the focus on theatre and performance largely precludes essays that focus on literary criticism or theory.   For the 2015 issue, we invite articles that help us celebrate and foreground our new title and affiliation.  Papers about any facet of Canadian, Latin American, or Caribbean theatre and performance will be especially welcome.  Essays about any facet of American theatre or performance presented in Europe, Asia, Africa, or Oceania will be of great interest.  Papers are welcome on any subject that fits the journal’s mission.   Submissions should follow the guidelines in The Chicago Manual of Style (endnotes, no Works Cited list).  Authors should submit articles as Word attachments to the editor, Dorothy Chansky, Department of Theatre and Dance, Texas Tech University, using the email address dorothychansky@gmail.com<mailto:dorothychansky@gmail.com>. In order to assist in the anonymous peer review process, the author’s identity should not be revealed in the manuscript except on a separate title page that should also include full contact information (academic affiliation, mailing address, home, cell, and work telephone numbers, and email address). Articles should be 5000-6500 words long including notes. Illustrations are highly desirable; authors are responsible for securing rights. Submission deadline is December 15, 2014. Please allow eight weeks for a response.   Theatre Annual, founded in 1942 by the Theatre Library Association, is now published in the fall of each year by The College of William and Mary in Virginia. More information available at http://theatreannual.wm.edu/<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v1/url?u=http://theatreannual.wm.edu/&k=xJ26TAwb97wzIimyhzPQ1w%3D%3D%0A&r=S%2BueP7XnyQYNkDgwHZchSe2hV%2BOvrfOiZYbXSvIEkGs%3D%0A&m=8BiQLECPXgnomyHr1H%2FMHtejTFTed4fQ2zboArEthUk%3D%0A&s=f96020696bbb3bd274f197940a24d4bbf6d69119c445178a2361b6fa1ffa19a1
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Sunday, October 26, 2014
Harry Ransom Center 2015–2016 research fellowships 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth The Harry Ransom Center, an internationally renowned humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, will award approximately 70 fellowships for 2015–2016 for projects that require substantial on-site use of its collections. The fellowships support research in all areas of the humanities, including literature, photography, film, art, the performing arts, music, and cultural history.The fellowships range from one to three months, with stipends of $3,000 per month. Also available are $1,200 to $1,700 travel stipends and dissertation fellowships with a $1,500 stipend. http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/research/fellowships/application/
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Sunday, October 26, 2014
Harvard Theatre Collection visiting fellowships 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth Houghton Library is offering visiting fellowships to assist scholars with the cost of travel and accommodation to pursue their research at the library. Houghton Library is the principal repository for rare books and manuscripts at Harvard University. The Harvard Theatre Collection, a department of Houghton, specializes in documentary material on the history of the performing arts. Its holdings encompass all manner of performance with special emphasis on the stage, music and dance, and popular entertainment. For a overview of fellowships to be awarded in 2015-2016 and to apply, please visit the library's website: http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/houghton/public_programs/visiting_fellowships.cfm. The deadline for submissions is Friday, January 16, 2015.    Dale Stinchcomb Curatorial Assistant│Harvard Theatre Collection Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 Tel: (617) 495-2445 Fax: (617) 495-1376 
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Sunday, October 26, 2014
Authors and book reviewers for Stage Directors and Choreographers Journal 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth This came through on the Directing Focus Group site and looks like a great opportunity for MTD members (apologies for cross posting):Call for Submissions: Authors and book reviewers for a peer-reviewed section of the SDC JournalPosted ByAnn Shanahan, Sunday, August 10, 2014Updated: Sunday, August 10, 2014Published quarterly,SDC Journalis distributed to members of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society nationwide and is available to industry constituents, theatre education programs, and the theatre-going public at large.SDC Journal’s missionis to give voice to an empowered collective of directors and choreographers working in all jurisdictions and venues across the country, encourage advocacy, and highlight artistic achievement.With editorial support by leading directors, choreographers and scholars representing the range of institutions of higher education across the country, theSDC Journalwill publish one academic essay (approximately 4,500 words) and one book review (approximately 1,200 words) per issue. We seek scholarly essays about directing and choreography with a focus on practice, in keeping with theJournal's mission statement. Studies might examine the relationship of theory to practice, the education and training of directors and choreographers, the relationship of academia and the profession, and how new directions in performance and production impact directors and choreographers.Submission requirements:--Essays: approx. 4,500 words (inclusive); book reviews: approx. 1,200 words (by invitation)--Double-spaced document in MS Word with no identifying author information--Separate cover sheet with author name, affiliation, and full contact information--Style: MLA or Chicago; endnotes should be kept to a minimum--Separate files for illustrations (photos, tables, etc.) with placement of illustration and caption indicated in document. Photos are encouraged but not required.--File names for photos should be clearly labeled: author's last name-fig1, etc. The author must obtain photo rights via a signed permission form. Please contact the co-editors for the form and specific photo requirements.--No simultaneous submissions will be accepted.Submissions will be acknowledged within one week and distributed to two readers to be blind refereed. Response time is approximately three months. Criteria for evaluation includes: the strength of argument, clarity of methodology, use of evidence, quality of writing, originality of thought, contribution to the field, and timeliness of subject matter.Please send submissions or queries electronically to both co-editors:Anne Fliotsos*, PhD, Professor of Theatre, Purdue University:Fliotsos@purdue.eduAnn M. Shanahan**, MFA, Associate Professor of Theatre, Loyola University Chicago:ashanah@luc.eduPeople interested in submitting a book review should submit queries electronically to both book review editor and associate editor:Travis Malone*, PhD, Associate Professor of Theatre and Chair, Virginia Wesleyan College:tmalone@vwc.eduKathleen M. McGeever**, MFA, Professor of Performance and Chair, Northern Arizona University:Kathleen.McGeever@nau.edu*Member of the Directing Program (DP) of the Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE);**MemberofATHE/DP and member or Associate of SDC 
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
Studies in Musical Theatre Special Issue: Living Large and Feeling Big 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth CFPStudies in Musical Theatre Special Issue: 10.1 All Kinds of Music is Pouring Out of Me: Living Large and Feeling Big in Musical Theatre Performance and Reception When the eponymous Sweet Charity (1966) realises somebody loves her, not only does the scene shift from dialogue into song, she acknowledges the largeness of her emotional response, singing “Now I’m a brass band.” Such moments in musical theatre are at the heart of the form’s appeal for many kinds of spectators, allowing them to vicariously live large for the duration of the musical and sometimes beyond. Raymond Knapp has investigated the persistence of identity formation as a process musical theatre facilitates for its creators, characters and audiences, and this special issue would build upon Knapp’s work. Musical theatre performers, writers, composers, directors, choreographers, and designers have thought big and crafted large elements in musical theatre for over a century. While Elizabeth Wollman considered the largeness of rock music as an element of musical theatre, and Jessica Sternfeld discussed megamusicals’ spectacle and epic narratives, this special issue of Studies in Musical Theatre will explore the idea of “largeness” from a range of perspectives, including but not limited to the work of creative teams, performers, audiences, and critics. Song and dance have long been recognized as the logical outlet for characters whose emotions grow too large to be expressed or contained by dialogue, but we aim to explore beyond the established function of these two elements to investigate in greater detail how musical theatre expands and what such growth accomplishes. We therefore welcome submissions considering the big emotions of characters and performers. Indeed the concept of the diva seems to account for the largeness of both the professional and performance experiences. Wayne Koestenbaum has investigated such reception through gay men's opera fandom, paying particular attention to the largeness of diva characters and performers, and while John Clum has explored gay men's musical theatre spectatorship, considering the big emotions, big sound and big personalities of Broadway divas, the diva's excesses are just one possible approach to the largeness inherent in musical theatre. Large formal elements are also worthy of examination, whether they be big dance numbers, big sets, or big choruses. Journalist David Sexton confessed to being amongst those "who are impervious to musicals,” and suggested those who love the form “just want to be pumped up with emotion by any means” (The Guardian 14 Jan. 2013). This special issue is therefore also interested in engaging with musicals’ potential to alienate spectators through its emotional largeness. Probing musical theatre’s big moments and achievements, this issue seeks to use a “historiography of bigness” to understand the history of musical theater in ways that does not rely on a narrative predicated on the peaks and valleys of success and failure. Therefore, new connections between established approaches to musical theatre scholarship will be forged and further grow the field. A special issue will make it possible to collect such approaches and map the historiography of bigness we have identified. Abstracts of 300 words for this special issue should be sent to Dr. Kathryn Edney, Regis College (kathryn.edney@regiscollege.edu) and Laura MacDonald, University of Portsmouth (laura.macdonald@port.ac.uk), by 1 December 2014. Once selected, the deadline for submitting completed article for peer review is 1 May 2015, for publication in 2016.
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
MATC Theatre History Symposium CFP 0 L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth CALL FOR PAPERSTheatre History SymposiumMid-America Theatre Conference (http://matc.us)Kansas City, March 19-22, 2015 Inspiration This year's Theatre History Symposium invites proposals forwarding intellectually and artistically inspiring research questions and methodologies. From objects and images that provoke and challenge our presumptions about subjectivity to texts and performances that demand innovative analytical frames, we seek theatrical catalysts that inspire us to shift our way of thinking about and performing in the world—whether on a global or personal level. If, as Walter Benjamin writes in The Origin of German Tragic Drama, "Origin is an eddy in the stream of becoming," then what specific conditions (sociopolitical, cultural, geographical, environmental, or artistic) create such eddies? How might working in the archives, watching or creating a performance, analyzing dramatic literature and productions, or scrutinizing a design sketch lead to moments of rupture within or alternate routes through theatre history and its well-rehearsed "origins"? In what ways have particular artists, theorists, and events inspired new modes of theatre production, performance art, and scholarly research? In a time of "economic austerity" and political unrest across the United States and abroad, what are the inherent risks or rewards of inspiring acts in artistic, educational, governmental, and cultural sectors? How does power manifest in these moments? What kinds of resistance to notions of inspiration—or aspiration—might our present moment demand and how are these acts reflected in our theatrical past? What insights might be gained by focusing on seemingly uninspiring (banal, quotidian, bland) subjects in research? We welcome your proposals encapsulating these or other rigorous scholarly questions encompassing the 2015 MATC theme of "Inspiration." Please submit proposals via email in Word or PDF Format to thsmatc@gmail.com and include the following:Your name, title (student, faculty, independent scholar), academic affiliation (if applicable), and a brief biography.Your contact information (particularly email).The title and abstract for your paper. Please limit abstracts to 250 words.Any audiovisual elements requested for your presentation. We cannot always guarantee audiovisual support, but will endeavor to take requests into account. Late requests may not be honored.We also welcome proposals for full panels. Contact the co-chairs for more information.                                                                                                                                     Chrystyna Dail, PhD                                                Joanne Zerdy, PhD                                                                                                                                    Ithaca College                                                         Illinois State UniversityTheatre History Symposium Co-Chairsthsmatc@gmail.com All proposals must be received by October 15, 2014 Robert A. Schanke AwardThe Robert A. Schanke Research Award is given annually to an nontenured faculty presenter of the Theatre History Symposium and carries a cash award of $500 as well as consideration for publication in Theatre History Studies, the journal of the Mid-America Theatre Conference. To be eligible for the Schanke Award, candidates must submit full, conference-length versions of their paper to the co-chairs at the email address above by February 20, 2015.
by L. MacDonald, University of Portsmouth
Tuesday, August 5, 2014

© 2018 Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE). All rights reserved.
1000 Westgate Drive, Suite 252 | St. Paul, MN 55114 | Phone: 800.918.9216 or 651.288.3430 | Fax: 651.290.2266