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The SDC Journal, an official publication of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society, announces the addition of a new peer-reviewed section, publishing scholarly articles and book reviews on the crafts of stage directing and choreography. There is a rolling deadline for submissions.

 

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CFP - Casting a Movement: The Welcome Table Initiative

Posted By William W. Lewis, University of Colorado Boulder, Sunday, January 7, 2018
Call for Proposals
Casting a Movement: The Welcome Table Initiative
Forthcoming from Routledge
Editors Claire Syler and Daniel Banks

 

 

Claire Syler and Daniel Banks seek proposals for the forthcoming book, Casting a Movement: The Welcome Table Initiative. This edited collection builds on the momentum generated by Daniel’s 2013 Theatre Topics article, “The Welcome Table: Casting for an Integrated Society,” and uses the essay as a conceptual anchor to frame a series of chapter-length dialogues focused on casting in contemporary U.S. theatre. Casting a Movement features seven chapters, each of which consists of three pieces of writing from three different authors:

  • A prologue, written by an academic and/or professional practitioner, introduces an issue related to casting.  (~100-500 words)

  • A case study, written by an academic and/or professional practitioner, offers a thickly described account of either The Welcome Table perspective or a related (but not necessarily congruent) approach to casting in practice.  (~4000-6000 words)

  • A dramaturgical response, written by a scholar, explores key historical and/or theoretical matters within the case study (~4000-6000 words).

To demonstrate how these pieces of writing might fit together, we have included a series of chapter sketches at the end of this call for proposals.*

We welcome proposals from individuals interested in contributing a prologue or case study.

 

Proposal Guidelines:
  • Email either a 100 word prologue proposal, or a 200-300 word case study proposal to both editors: sylerc@missouri.edu and daniel@dnaworks.org
  • Include a short bio of 50 words at the end of your proposal
  • Include a two-page CV highlighting your artistry/research
  • Please use Times New Roman 12 pt. font, double spaced
  • Illustrations welcome
  • When composing your proposal, please consider the following:
    • What particular aspect of casting would you like to discuss?  
    • What practical event in which your case study is situated—e.g. a classroom, production, etc?
    • How might your work be impacted by, or in dialogue with, a Welcome Table perspective?

The preferred deadline for proposals is February 1, 2018.

 

*The following chapter sketches demonstrate possible scenarios of how authors’ voices might fit together in dialogue.

Chapter Sketch A
In a prologue, a Native American playwright encourages U.S. theatres to produce plays by, and create performances with, Native American theatre artists. In a case study, a Native American director uses a Welcome Table perspective to describe the ethical negotiations involved in casting Native and non-Native actors in the telling of an Indigenous narrative. In a dramaturgical response, a theatre historian provides a history of “redface” in U.S. theatre and performance to demonstrate the longstanding misrepresentation of Native Americans in cultural production, and the need for practical work (such as the case study) to replace oppressive portrayals with more complex renderings of Indigenous identities.

Chapter Sketch B
In a prologue, a prominent professional actress critiques university/conservatory acting classes for using casting to re-inscribe dominant views of representation. In a case study, a university acting instructor offers a course design for an acting class that uses a Welcome Table understanding of casting as an organizing construct. The course design details learning progressions and exercises that purposefully disrupt “traditional" casting schemes. A scholar uses historical analysis to explore why acting classes in the U.S. are predominantly tethered to Stanislavski-based realism. By situating the practical account within a broader historical narrative, the dramaturgical response further explains how revised practice and curriculum generates new knowledge.

Chapter Sketch C
In a prologue, the Artistic Director of a major regional theatre discusses the company’s use of multi-ethnic casting alongside dialogues designed to inform audiences of production choices and research. In a case study, an academic practitioner describes using a similar strategy with a pedagogical bent in a university setting—producing campus-wide forums on implicit bias in conjunction with a theatre production featuring a multi-ethnic cast. In the case study, the academic practitioner stresses the importance of producing plays by authors writing for a plurality of identities (e.g. Elaine Avila, Naomi Iizuka and Caridad Svich), as well as employing Banks’s invocation of Ayanna Thompson’s formulation, “the sociology of viewing,” as a conceptual tool for audience members to consider. In a dramaturgical response, a scholar uses performance theory to explain how the varying modalities of performance iteratively enforce the production and viewing of cultural signs, which is why multiethnic casting and audience engagement opportunities can serve to expand preconceptions.


--
Daniel Banks, Ph.D.
Co-Director, DNAWORKS
"Dialogue and Healing through the Arts"

Phone: (212) 765-4914
Cell: (917) 653-6888
Fax: (866) 394-6033
Daniel@dnaworks.org
www.dnaworks.org

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ONGOING Call for Submission SDC JOURNAL Peer-Reviewed Section

Posted By Ann M. Shanahan, Loyola University Chicago, Tuesday, October 3, 2017
 
SDC JOURNAL PEER-REVIEWED SECTION 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS 

Published quarterly by SDC, the new SDC Journal Peer-Reviewed Section serves directors and choreographers working in the profession and in institutions of higher learning. SDC’s mission is to give voice to an empowered collective of directors and choreographers working in all jurisdictions and venues across the country, encourage advocacy and highlight artistic achievement.

To that end, SDC Journal seeks essays with accessible language that focus on practice and practical application and that exemplify the sorts of fruitful intersections that can occur between the academic/scholarly and the profession/craft. Examples of these types of articles include:

•    Writing as a scholar about directorial or choreographic practice (by oneself or another); practice-based research.

•    Traditional scholarship that inspires creative work (original practices, historical context, theory).

•    Dramaturgical material from a production or piece that might be of interest to other directors or choreographers, such as topic-specific research or elements of process related to script formulation, adaptation or devising.

•    Approaches to training, teaching and/or mentoring the transitions between undergraduate, M.F.A. or Ph.D. training and the profession.

•    Continuing education/training for directors and choreographers.

•    Scholarship about sociological dynamics of the profession—such as diversity and equity in hiring, rates of compensation and benefits, representation and unions, intellectual property rights, etc.

•    Professional-academic partnerships (eg. academic institutions with professional theatre partnerships, residencies, or guest artists programs): What are best practices? How might we further build connections?

•    Scholarship on innovations in the field, such as new approaches to collaboration, casting, staging, ensemble- building and use of technology—as these impact professional work and/or teaching in higher education. 

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

•    Essays: approx. 4,500 words (inclusive). Shorter essays will also be considered.
•    Double-spaced document in MS Word with no identifying author information.
•    Separate cover sheet with author name, affiliation, and full contact information.
•    Style: MLA parenthetical citations; endnotes should be kept to a minimum.
•    Separate files for illustrations with placement of illustration and caption indicated in     document. Photos are encouraged but not required.
•    No simultaneous submissions will be accepted.

Submissions will be acknowledged within one week and distributed to two readers to be blind-refereed. Response time is approximately three months. Criteria for evaluation includes: the strength of argument, clarity of methodology, use of evidence, quality of writing, originality of thought, contribution to the field, and timeliness of subject matter. 

Please send submissions or queries electronically to both co-editors: 

Ann M. Shanahan MFA, Associate Professor of Theatre Loyola University Chicago 
ashanah@luc.edu
 
David Callaghan MFA, Phd, Professor of Theatre, University of Montevallo, callaghand@montevallo.edu

SEEKING BOOK REVIEWERS 

The SDC Journal Peer-Reviewed Section seeks artists and practitioners to review books and publications that focus upon the field of directing or choreography. The book review section is an edited section that seeks to provide SDC Members and readers with in-depth analysis of scholarly and popular material that is inspired by or has a direct impact on the work of directors or choreographers. 

For those seeking their first foray into publishing, the book review is an excellent way for artists to learn the publishing process and explore the development of their ideas in-print. In addition to reviewers, the editors also seek book titles and publications for review that would be of interest to SDC Members. 

Inquiries, for both reviews and titles for review, should be directed to: 

Kathleen M. McGeever MFA, Professor of Performance and Chair Northern Arizona University 
Kathleen.McGeever@nau.edu
 
Emily Rollie PhD, Assistant Professor, Central Washington University
erollie@gmail.com

(For more information, visit www.sdcweb.org/community/sdc-journal/sdc-journal-peer-review.)

 

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Call for Submissions - PARtake: The Journal of Performance as Research

Posted By William W. Lewis, University of Colorado Boulder, Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Dear Directing Focus Group Members,

 

PARtake:The Journal of Performance as Research is a new e-journal that has just launched.  Please see the attached Call for Submissions and take a look at the journal website.

PARtake is a new e-journal dedicated to exploring the theory and application of performance in practice, and the research outputs created through these processes. Performance-as-Research is, for us, an investigation into the material, epistemological, and ontological fundamentals of all forms of performance, intended or otherwise. We seek work created and critiqued from the “scholartist” perspective. Questions we ask are: how does practice inform theory? How does theory inform practice? How do we form an affective and effective praxis? What is embodied research? Can the research we engage in be a collaborative and/or collective experience? In investigating these questions, we embrace voices that have not been fully considered as valid and sufficiently rigorous in the traditional academic research model, and question in what ways we adequately represent the “products” generated inside the practice-as-research model.

 

Call for Submissions 

How do you articulate and define performance-as-research? How can performance-as-research open up possibilities for novel ways of understanding the synergy between artistic practice and theoretical inquiry?

The often uneasy binary between arts practice and academic institutions in the United States is perhaps even greater than the dichotomy existing between theory and practice. How might rigorous and innovative research occur within traditionally regarded performance pieces? Also, how might methods from other disciplines such as New Media Studies, Architecture, Anthropology, Education, and the Visual Arts consider their research as performative, expanding more traditional approaches within the field?

We welcome new forms of textual analysis and documentation desiring to widen the aperture of performance writing, offering a continually evolving set of requirements and thus are looking for submissions of artistic and academic research presented in all formats, including traditional, creative, innovative, and integrative. We also welcome traditional forms of research like the academic article.

We ask for submissions in five areas:

Articles

We welcome articles that engage with the prompt below:

When we write about performance, what happens to that performance? How does our writing about performance re-perform, redefine, and recreate the work? In this process, what does the source material now become? In what ways can the language we use to document or describe what happens in a specific space and temporality radically open up the work and its associative discourse/s, rather than act as a restraining force through analysis? There are many languages to explore and utilize in this investigation. We invite experiments in writing about/for/in performance. We invite the act of writing as research in itself, as a way to infiltrate, aerate, and celebrate the discoveries embedded in the process of making--and presenting--artistic work. Please see guidelines for specifications and style expectations.

Multimedia/Digital Explorations

For digital content we additionally ponder: in what ways can digital content as performance and research open up a new realm of accessibility and inclusivity? How does a different form of accessibility via digital technology influence the work itself or how the work is perceived? How does your digital work dismantle, spur, or re-imagine research? How does your work “perform” digital research? Does your art function as an experiment? How do you identify yourself as a researching performance artist by the context and framing of your work? Who or what is the subject of the research? We invite exploration of these and other questions through various multimedia and digital media, including but not limited to: video, web-based pieces, photo essays, audio recording and graphic recording. Please see guidelines for specifications and style expectations.

Visual Art

PARtake contends that various modes of visual art have the ability to act as a form of performance in itself, detached from any formal exhibition of said work. Offering this as a challenge to prospective artists and critics, we welcome photo documentation of visual artworks that have been approached as a form of research-based inquiry (loosely construed). We welcome work from artists with or without accompanying written documentation explaining and/or critiquing the artwork as performance. Please see guidelines for specifications and style expectations.

Performance Reviews

To assess the state of the field and the ways in which artists engage in multiple modes of expressing narrative, we invite performance reviews of events used in/as research as well as those created specifically for exhibition and/or entertainment. We welcome performance reviews from various fields. Our performance reviews section will be published on an ongoing basis, beginning in April of 2016, so that we may exhibit criticism and exploration of works still in recent memory or continuing to perform. Please see guidelines for specifications and style expectations.

Book Reviews 

We publish reviews of books relevant to performance in general, with a specific interest in Performance-As-Research, Performance Philosophy, Performance and Technology, and Performance Studies, broadly defined. Please see guidelines for format and submission process.

Note:

If your investigation/project falls outside these categories but you believe it still operates within the spirit of the journal, please feel free to contact us.

All submission inquiries should begin by visiting partakejournal.org and filling out our official submission/inquiry form. This part of the process includes a proposal and/or abstract submission due by April 1st. Guidelines for submissions are found on the website.

Upon abstract/proposal approval, final submissions will be due May 15th.

For questions about the call for submission please contact the managing editors at partakejournal@gmail.com.

 

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SDC Journal Peer-Reviewed Section Call for Submissions

Posted By Ann M. Shanahan, Loyola University Chicago, Sunday, August 9, 2015
Updated: Monday, August 10, 2015
SDC JOURNAL                    
NEW PEER-REVIEWED SECTION 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS 

Published quarterly by SDC, the new SDC Journal Peer-Reviewed Section serves directors and choreographers working in the profession and in institutions of higher learning. SDC’s mission is to give voice to an empowered collective of directors and choreographers working in all jurisdictions and venues across the country, encourage advocacy and highlight artistic achievement.

To that end, SDC Journal seeks essays with accessible language that focus on practice and practical application and that exemplify the sorts of fruitful intersections that can occur between the academic/scholarly and the profession/craft. Examples of these types of articles include:

•    Writing as a scholar about directorial or choreographic practice (by oneself or another); practice-based research.

•    Traditional scholarship that inspires creative work (original practices, historical context, theory).

•    Dramaturgical material from a production or piece that might be of interest to other directors or choreographers, such as topic-specific research or elements of process related to script formulation, adaptation or devising.

•    Approaches to training, teaching and/or mentoring the transitions between undergraduate, M.F.A. or Ph.D. training and the profession.

•    Continuing education/training for directors and choreographers.

•    Scholarship about sociological dynamics of the profession—such as diversity and equity in hiring, rates of compensation and benefits, representation and unions, intellectual property rights, etc.

•    Professional-academic partnerships (eg. academic institutions with professional theatre partnerships, residencies, or guest artists programs): What are best practices? How might we further build connections?

•    Scholarship on innovations in the field, such as new approaches to collaboration, casting, staging, ensemble- building and use of technology—as these impact professional work and/or teaching in higher education. 

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

•    Essays: approx. 4,500 words (inclusive). Shorter essays will also be considered.
•    Double-spaced document in MS Word with no identifying author information.
•    Separate cover sheet with author name, affiliation, and full contact information.
•    Style: MLA parenthetical citations; endnotes should be kept to a minimum.
•    Separate files for illustrations with placement of illustration and caption indicated in document. Photos are encouraged but not required.
•    No simultaneous submissions will be accepted.

Submissions will be acknowledged within one week and distributed to two readers to be blind-refereed. Response time is approximately three months. Criteria for evaluation includes: the strength of argument, clarity of methodology, use of evidence, quality of writing, originality of thought, contribution to the field, and timeliness of subject matter. 

Please send submissions or queries electronically to both co-editors: 

Anne Fliotsos PhD, Professor of Theatre Purdue University 
Fliotsos@purdue.edu 

Ann M. Shanahan MFA, Associate Professor of Theatre Loyola University Chicago 
ashanah@luc.edu

SEEKING BOOK REVIEWERS 

The SDC Journal Peer-Reviewed Section seeks artists and practitioners to review books and publications that focus upon the field of directing or choreography. The book review section is an edited section that seeks to provide SDC Members and readers with in-depth analysis of scholarly and popular material that is inspired by or has a direct impact on the work of directors or choreographers. 

For those seeking their first foray into publishing, the book review is an excellent way for artists to learn the publishing process and explore the development of their ideas in-print. In addition to reviewers, the editors also seek book titles and publications for review that would be of interest to SDC Members. 

Inquiries, for both reviews and titles for review, should be directed to: 

Travis Malone PhD, Associate Professor of Theatre and Chair Virginia Wesleyan College
tmalone@vwc.edu

Kathleen M. McGeever MFA, Professor of Performance and Chair Northern Arizona University 
Kathleen.McGeever@nau.edu

(For more information, visit www.sdcweb.org/community/sdc-journal/sdc-journal-peer-review.)

Tags:  SDC  SDC Journal  Stage Directors and Choreographers 

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