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Searching for Fulbright Panelists for Boston

Posted By University of New Hampshire, Friday, October 13, 2017
Please let me know if anyone would like to join a panel on preparing Fulbright proposals. Please email me at djk@unh.edu. Thanks! 
David Kaye

Tags:  Fulbright  Panel  Proposal ATHE 2018 

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TASC Call for Proposals (2018 Boston)

Posted By Theresa R. Dudeck Ph.D., Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Call For Proposals:

Theatre and Social Change (TASC) Focus Group Sessions

Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) Conference

Boston, Massachusetts

August 1-5, 2018

 

Submission Deadlines:

November 1, 2017 (complete panel proposals: submit to www.athe.org)

October 20, 2017 (individual paper proposals: submit to trdudeck@gmail.com)

 

The Theatre and Social Change Focus Group (TASC) invites proposals for next year’s conference to be held in Boston, MA. The 2018 conference theme is “Theatres of Revolution: Performance, Pedagogy, and Protest” and invites participants to consider the following:

The 2018 ATHE Conference focuses on revolution, resistance, and protest, and the multiple ways these ideas – and the actions that spring from them – impact theatre in higher education. Drawing on the city of Boston for its historical significance in the American Revolution, and as a site of both academic excellence and artistic innovation, we aim to explore revolutions at the multiple intersections of politics, theatre education, and professional practice.

Revolution and resistance are tools employed combat injustice and inequality. However, these tools can be used to effect change in any direction, to create more open and equitable societies, or less. In the 2016 US presidential election and its wake, and heading into 2018 midterm elections, the concept of revolution has been used by both left and right. We will consider various meanings of revolution, in scholarship and performance as well as in our work as educators with students in the classroom, rehearsal hall, and in the larger context of college campuses.

The conference theme invites examination of ways in which electoral representation resonates with theory and practice in theatre-making: How does representation in politics relate to equitable and fair casting and employment practices? How do changing practices require revolutions in production methods and pedagogies? How might theatre scholarship serve a meaningful public function, engaging with performances – both artistic and civic – that surround us? How might we create art that is aesthetically revolutionary and that activates audiences to make lasting social change?

TASC invites you to consider the conference theme in your proposals for panels and roundtables, as well as proposals that challenge traditional session formats through performance, workshops, or other “session events.”  TASC remains committed to giving voice to a diversity of methodological approaches and geographical emphases.

Additional topics to consider include (but are not limited to):

·      Theatricality in protest. Rebellion vs. Riots: Who gets to say which is which?

·      Theatre as protest (resistance to postcolonial power, response to political crisis, challenging gentrification, etc.)

·      Who is the audience to theatre of revolution and protest? How do we foreclose or open dialogue? How do we engage in civil discourse? How do we humanize the oppressor?

·      Implications for performance when words fail us in the lack of civil discourse, but images often don’t.

·      Performance for problematizing the binary “Us” vs. “Them”

·      Theatre of the Oppressor

·      How is theatre centering and leveraging the voices of marginalized communities?

·      Performance work with law enforcement, including Theatre of the Oppressed

·      Detroit riots vs. Boston resistance – what does it mean to be revolutionary?

·      Graduate students & Instructors fighting for their rights (TA, GAs, part-time faculty, etc.)

·      Activism happening around issues of Race, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (e.g., Concerned Students 1950 at Mizzou)

·      The performativity of protests and Town Halls since Trump

·      Pedagogical perspectives as students are politicized by Brexit and Trump

·      Involvement with The Ghost Light Project https://theghostlightproject.com/

 

Although full panel proposals are highly encouraged, TASC will accept individual paper proposals. No guarantee can be made that individual papers will find a place on a panel. If you would like to submit an individual paper, please e-mail your paper proposal, contact information, and a brief bio to Theresa R. Dudeck, TASC Focus Group conference planner, at trdudeck@gmail.com no later than October 20, 2017.

When planning your proposal, remember that:

  • Presenters are limited to two (2) appearances (i.e.: Session chair, Participant, Moderator, Respondent, etc.) Exceptions are at the discretion of the Conference Committee
  • All presenters are expected to be current members of ATHE
  • All presenters are expected to register/pay for the conference

Tips for submitting proposals:

1.     Proposals for complete panels (with all presenters assembled) should be submitted directly to ATHE through the website at http://www.athe.org. The deadline for all proposals is November 1, 2017. Please forward a copy of your proposal to TASC conference planner, Theresa R. Dudeck, at trdudeck@gmail.com.

2.     If you would like assistance in panel coordination, please use the TASC message board on TASC’s page at http://www.athe.org/members/group.aspx?id=130358 (or email individual paper proposals to the TASC conference planner at trdudeck@gmail.com no later than Friday, October 20). Please note, this option does not guarantee submission/acceptance to the conference, which is determined by ATHE and not TASC.

 

3.     Submissions may be either discipline specific or multidisciplinary. In general, we are interested in panel topics that address: the historical role of theatre with a conscious social perspective; the research and practice of theatre with a focus on the dynamic relationship between performance and society; and on cultural analysis and performance praxis which sees itself as an agent for social criticism and/or change. We encourage proposals that include both senior and junior scholars, as well as graduate students. A senior scholar could be asked to serve as a respondent. We also encourage collaborations with other Focus Groups to develop dynamic multidisciplinary sessions. Please see below for specific rules and guidelines for multidisciplinary proposals.

For Theatre and Social Change Specific Proposals: If your session addresses primarily theatre and social change, then when prompted in the application, choose “Single Focus Group” and then “Theatre and Social Change” as the group that should review your proposal. When the selection process begins, all TASC-targeted proposals will be sent to the TASC conference planner. The TASC Executive Committee will rank the proposals, and the conference committee will use those rankings to make final programming decisions. You must submit your proposal to the TASC conference planner (trdudeck@gmail.com) before submitting a TASC proposal to ATHE. Also feel free to contact the conference planner if you have any problems or concerns or if you are curious as to whether or not your proposal is appropriate for TASC.

For Multi-Disciplinary (MD) Proposals: If your session has a TASC focus but is also appropriate for another Focus Group (FG), you can check “Multidisciplinary Session” on the online proposal application.  Then you will be asked to select a “Primary Focus Group Sponsor” (e.g., Theatre and Social Change) and a “Secondary Focus Group Sponsor” (e.g., Directing Program). To make an MD proposal you must contact, by email, the conference planners for each FG selected before submitting proposal online in order to receive feedback and to make sure the proposals are appropriate for each FG. If one of your targeted FGs is not enthusiastic, it is far better to know before submission and perhaps find another FG to increase its chance of being accepted (MD proposals are ranked by each of its affiliated FGs). See www.athe.org for contact information for FG conference planners.

 

ATHE Theatre and Social Change Focus Group webpage:

http://www.athe.org/members/group.aspx?id=130358

 

ATHE’s Call for Proposals Information webpage (with links to online proposal applications):

https://athe.site-ym.com/page/18_home

 

 

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TASC Call for Proposals (2017)

Posted By Theresa R. Dudeck Ph.D., Friday, September 16, 2016

Call For Proposals:

Theatre and Social Change (TASC) Focus Group Sessions

Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) Conference

Las Vegas, Nevada, Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino

August 3-6, 2017

 

Submission Deadlines:

November 1, 2016 (complete panel proposals: submit to www.athe.org)

October 15, 2016 (individual paper proposals: submit to dudeck@chapman.edu)

The Theatre and Social Change Focus Group (TASC) invites proposals for next year’s conference to be held in Las Vegas, Nevada, at Planet Hollywood.  The 2017 conference theme is “Spectacle: balancing education, theory, and praxis #ATHE2017OfBreadAndCircuses” and invites participants to consider the following:

In Poetics, Aristotle ranks spectacle last among his six constituent elements of drama, privileging the poetic over the visual, claiming that spectacle “stirs the emotions” yet “is less a matter of art than the others.” (GRUBE) In the millennia since, countless artists and scholars have championed the aesthetics of theatre and stood in defense of spectacle. Nevertheless, a bias persists.

The 2017 ATHE Conference Committee invites you to join us in Las Vegas, Nevada, for an examination of the role of spectacle in theatre practice, scholarship, and pedagogy. What opportunities do an emphasis on spectacle present to us as artists, scholars, theorists, and educators? Does a spectacle-driven theatre lead us away from Aristotle’s aims, or do we find that enhanced spectacle serves to support and strengthen plot, character, thought, diction, and music? How have certain bodies been made spectacular? How does the use of spectacle highlight or obscure the politics of performance, representation, and staging? What ethical and political responsibilities must artists, scholars, and activists negotiate when employing spectacle in performance, design, scholarship, and/or dramaturgy?

TASC invites you to consider the conference theme in your proposals for panels and roundtables, as well as proposals that challenge traditional session formats through performance, workshops, or other “session events.”  TASC remains committed to giving voice to a diversity of methodological approaches and geographical emphases.

Additional topics to consider include (but are not limited to):

·      Tokenism in a spectacle-driven industry

·      Considerations of the dominance of visuality in spectacle

·      Spectacle as ecologically unsustainable

·      The history of spectacle in theatre and social change

·      Spectacle on a dime: performative strategies utilizing bodies, minds, and unconventional performance venues (e.g., natural or environmental settings)

·      Using our tools as artists to analyze structures of oppression in racial America

·      Changing critical methodologies in the field of theatre and social change

·      Application of theatre methodologies for social, organizational, and cultural change in fields beyond the theatre

·      Exploration of issues central to systems of oppression, oppressed peoples, or the politics of defining oppression through performative practice

·      Pedagogy and training as critical practice

Although full panel proposals are highly encouraged, TASC will accept individual paper proposals. No guarantee can be made that individual papers will find a place on a panel. If you would like to submit an individual paper, please e-mail your paper proposal, contact information, and a brief bio to Theresa R. Dudeck, TASC Focus Group conference planner, at dudeck@chapman.edu, no later than October 15, 2016.

When planning your proposal, remember that:

  • Presenters are limited to two (2) appearances (i.e.: Session chair, Participant, Moderator, Respondent, etc.) Exceptions are at the discretion of the Conference Committee
  • All presenters are expected to be current members of ATHE
  • All presenters are expected to register/pay for the conference

Tips for submitting proposals:

1.     Proposals for complete panels (with all presenters assembled) should be submitted directly to ATHE through the website at http://www.athe.org. The deadline for all proposals is November 1, 2016. Please forward a copy of your proposal to TASC conference planner, Theresa R. Dudeck, at dudeck@chapman.edu.

2.     If you would like assistance in panel coordination, please use the TASC message board on TASC’s page at http://www.athe.org/members/group.aspx?id=130358 (or email individual paper proposals to the TASC conference planner at dudeck@chapman.edu no later than Saturday, October 15). Please note, this option does not guarantee submission/acceptance to the conference, which is determined by ATHE and not TASC.

 

3.     Submissions may be either discipline specific or multidisciplinary. In general, we are interested in panel topics that address: the historical role of theatre with a conscious social perspective; the research and practice of theatre with a focus on the dynamic relationship between performance and society; and on cultural analysis and performance praxis which sees itself as an agent for social criticism and/or change. We encourage proposals that include both senior and junior scholars, as well as graduate students. A senior scholar could be asked to serve as a respondent. We also encourage collaborations with other Focus Groups to develop dynamic multidisciplinary sessions. Please see below for specific rules and guidelines for multidisciplinary proposals.

For Theatre and Social Change Specific Proposals: If your session addresses primarily theatre and social change, then when prompted in the application, choose “Single Focus Group” and then “Theatre and Social Change” as the group that should review your proposal. When the selection process begins, all TASC-targeted proposals will be sent to the TASC conference planner. The TASC Executive Committee will rank the proposals, and the conference committee will use those rankings to make final programming decisions. You must submit your proposal to the TASC conference planner (dudeck@chapman.edu) before submitting a TASC proposal to ATHE. Also feel free to contact the conference planner if you have any problems or concerns or if you are curious as to whether or not your proposal is appropriate for TASC.

For Multi-Disciplinary (MD) Proposals: If your session has a TASC focus but is also appropriate for another Focus Group (FG), you can check “Multidisciplinary Session” on the online proposal application.  Then you will be asked to select a “Primary Focus Group Sponsor” (e.g., Theatre and Social Change) and a “Secondary Focus Group Sponsor” (e.g., Directing Program). To make an MD proposal you must contact, by email, the conference planners for each FG selected before submitting proposal online in order to receive feedback and to make sure the proposals are appropriate for each FG. If one of your targeted FGs is not enthusiastic, it is far better to know before submission and perhaps find another FG to increase its chance of being accepted (MD proposals are ranked by each of its affiliated FGs). See www.athe.org for contact information for FG conference planners.

ATHE Theatre and Social Change Focus Group webpage:

http://www.athe.org/members/group.aspx?id=130358

ATHE’s Call for Proposals Information webpage (with links to online proposal applications):

http://www.athe.org/general/custom.asp?page=17_CFP

 

 

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TASC Schedule Summer 2016

Posted By Annalisa Dias-Mandoly, DC Coalition for Theatre and Social Justice, Tuesday, April 26, 2016
Good evening TASC members,

 

Please see below and attached for a full schedule of TASC events at this summer's conference. Please note the Peace Room Preconference, which is being presented by ATHE's Interactive Theatre Subcommittee and the Goodman Theatre, and which we are co-sponsoring along with the Theatre as a Liberal Art FG. Registration for the Preconference will be through the ATHE website. 

I'd also like to propose that we schedule an informal happy hour or visit to a local bar at some point during the conference. I know the Dramaturgy FG has done this in the past, to great success. Perhaps we can join them or carve out our own time to connect on a more informal level. More info on that will be forthcoming.

For now, here are our very exciting officially scheduled events:

Wednesday, August 10
3pm-6pm Peace Room Preconference (offsite at the Goodman Theatre)
Thursday, August 11
3:15pm-4:15pm TASC Membership Meeting
Friday, August 12
8am-9:30am Resident and Non-Resident Aliens: Theatre and the Citizenship of the Oppressed in the Middle East
2:15pm-3:45pm Theatre of the Oppressed as Political/Aesthetic Labor: Toward Timely (Never Timeless) Work
4pm-5:30pm Writing for/with Faculty and Student Bodies: Applied Theatre for University Communities
4pm-5:30pm Ensemble-Made Chicago: The Politics of Creating Collaborative Performance
5:45pm-7:15pm Building Capacity:  Diversity in Inclusive Theatre Education
Saturday, August 13
8:15am-9:45am TASC Debut Panel
8:15am-9:45am Generation Debt: A Performance and Discussion 
2:45pm-3:15pm TASC Follow-up Meeting
5:15pm-6:45pm Practicing Freedom and Critical Consciousness: Bodily exploration and Theatrical Work with Teenagers 
in Urban Settings
5:15pm-6:45pm Living and Laboring: Representations of Disability in Theatre
7pm-8:30pm The Work of Theatrical Jazz Aesthetic(s): Pedagogy, Theory, Justice
Sunday, August 14
8am-9:30am Puppetry for Social Change: Building an International Network
9:45am-11:15am The Games We Play
9:45am-11:15am Out of the Peace Room -- performances from the Peace Room Preconference
11:30am-1pm Prison Work: Creating Theatre with Incarcerated Artists
 
Questions? Annalisa Dias (diasmandolya@cua.edu)

 

Looking forward to this summer!

Annalisa Dias

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Call for Submissions - PARtake: The Journal of Performance as Research

Posted By William W. Lewis, University of Colorado Boulder, Sunday, March 13, 2016

PARtake: the journal of performance as research
Issue 1, Volume 1
Summer 2016
Pushing the Boundaries: Performing Research

 

PARtake is a new e-journal dedicated to exploring the theory and application of performance
in practice, and the research outputs created through these processes. Performance-as-
Research is, for us, an investigation into the material, epistemological, and ontological
fundamentals of all forms of performance, intended or otherwise. We seek work created and
critiqued from the “scholartist” perspective. 

 

Questions we ask are: how does practice inform
theory? How does theory inform practice? How do we form an affective and effective praxis?
What is embodied research? Can the research we engage in be a collaborative and/or
collective experience? In investigating these questions, we embrace voices that have not been
fully considered as valid and sufficiently rigorous in the traditional academic research model,
and question in what ways we adequately represent the “products” generated inside the
practice-as-research model.

 

Call for Submissions

How do you articulate and define performance-as-research? How can performance-asresearch
open up possibilities for novel ways of understanding the synergy between artistic
practice and theoretical inquiry? The often uneasy binary between arts practice and academic institutions in the United States

is perhaps even greater than the dichotomy existing between theory and practice. How might
rigorous and innovative research occur within traditionally regarded performance pieces?
Also, how might methods from other disciplines such as New Media Studies, Architecture,
Anthropology, Education, and the Visual Arts consider their research as performative,
expanding more traditional approaches within the field?

We welcome new forms of textual analysis and documentation desiring to widen the aperture
of performance writing, offering a continually evolving set of requirements and thus are
looking for submissions of artistic and academic research presented in all formats, including
traditional, creative, innovative, and integrative. We also welcome traditional forms of
research like the academic article.

 

All submission inquiries should begin by visiting partakejournal.org and filling
out our official submission/inquiry form. This part of the process includes a
proposal and/or abstract submission due by April 1st. Guidelines for
submissions are found on the website.

Upon abstract/proposal approval, final submissions will be due May 15th.
For questions about the call for submission please contact the managing editors
at partakejournal@gmail.com.

 

We ask for submissions in five areas:

 

Articles

 

We welcome articles that engage with the prompt below:
When we write about performance, what happens to that performance? How does our writing
about performance re-perform, redefine, and recreate the work? In this process, what does
the source material now become? In what ways can the language we use to document or
describe what happens in a specific space and temporality radically open up the work and its
associative discourse/s, rather than act as a restraining force through analysis? There are
many languages to explore and utilize in this investigation. We invite experiments in writing
about/for/in performance. We invite the act of writing as research in itself, as a way to
infiltrate, aerate, and celebrate the discoveries embedded in the process of making--and
presenting--artistic work. Please see guidelines for specifications and style expectations.

 

Multimedia/Digital Explorations

For digital content we additionally ponder: in what ways can digital content as performance
and research open up a new realm of accessibility and inclusivity? How does a different form
of accessibility via digital technology influence the work itself or how the work is perceived?
How does your digital work dismantle, spur, or re-imagine research? How does your work
“perform” digital research? Does your art function as an experiment? How do you identify
yourself as a researching performance artist by the context and framing of your work? Who
or what is the subject of the research? We invite exploration of these and other questions
through various multimedia and digital media, including but not limited to: video, web-based
pieces, photo essays, audio recording and graphic recording. Please see guidelines for
specifications and style expectations.

 

Visual Art

PARtake contends that various modes of visual art have the ability to act as a form of
performance in itself, detached from any formal exhibition of said work. Offering this as a
challenge to prospective artists and critics, we welcome photo documentation of visual
artworks that have been approached as a form of research-based inquiry (loosely construed).
We welcome work from artists with or without accompanying written documentation
explaining and/or critiquing the artwork as performance. Please see guidelines for
specifications and style expectations.

 

Performance Reviews

To assess the state of the field and the ways in which artists engage in multiple modes of
expressing narrative, we invite performance reviews of events used in/as research as well as
those created specifically for exhibition and/or entertainment. We welcome performance
reviews from various fields. Our performance reviews section will be published on an ongoing
basis, beginning in April of 2016, so that we may exhibit criticism and exploration of works
still in recent memory or continuing to perform. Please see guidelines for specifications and
style expectations.

 

Book Reviews

We publish reviews of books relevant to performance in general, with a specific interest in
Performance-As-Research, Performance Philosophy, Performance and Technology, and
Performance Studies, broadly defined. Please see guidelines for format and submission
process.

 

Note:

If your investigation/project falls outside these categories but you believe it still operates
within the spirit of the journal, please feel free to contact us.

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Summer Intensive in Bali , Indonesia

Posted By Micha Espinosa, Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Dear Colleagues,

 

I'm writing to update you on -- or to introduce you to -- an exciting summer intensive available to you and your students, Bali Taksu: The Power of Clown. You can learn more about our program here: Balitaksu.org.

 

We are now accepting applications for the June 11-26th workshop, which includes:

o   Balinese Dance

o   Kecak Voice

o   Gamelan

o   Balinese Mask

o   Chekhov Technique

o   Clown

o   Grotowski

o   Fitzmaurice Voicework

o   Yoga

o   Internships & College Credit Avaiable

 

Attached is a digital postcard advertising the features of our program. Please feel free to contact me or Aole Miller (dreamshavewings@gmail.com) with any questions about the program.

 

Thank you for your consideration and all best wishes for 2016!

 

Sincerely,

 

Micha Espinosa

 

--

Micha Espinosa

Arizona State University

School of Film, Dance, and Theatre

Associate Professor

Barret Honors Faculty

Director of Diversity and Inclusion – Fitzmaurice Institute

Monologues for Latino/a Actors

Program Coordinator Bali Taksu

micha.espinosa@asu.edu

 

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CFP: The Dangerous Work of Theatre and Social Change

Posted By Karen J. Martinson, Chicago State University, Thursday, October 22, 2015

Hi All!

I am hoping to put together a panel interrogating the tension between the rhetoric - and the expectation of -  a safe space and the necessity for vulnerability and challenge in the crafting and teaching of theatre and social change:

 

When does safety become an obstacle to the necessary work of socially engaged theatre?

In the crafting and teaching of theatre, we often laud the creation of a safe space. But how much does this rhetoric contradict our hoped-for desires to initiate social change by challenging the status quo? Submissions might discuss this topic through a variety of different perspectives:  

  • Performances on “unsafe” topics – what are the ethics of asking our students to perform on and about controversial topics?
  • When studying theatre is a (financial, physical, emotional) risk?
  • Can theatre really be the “safe space” we often speak of?
  • How do trigger warnings and the like impact the teaching and crafting of theatre?
  • Should theatre classes come with a trigger warning?
  • How does privilege impact notions of safety and danger?
  • How does theatre operate in "unsafe" spaces (prisons, war zones, protest sites, etc.)?
  • How might taking dangerous risks through theatre create real safety in communities?

If you are interested in participating, please contact Karen Jean Martinson at misskarenjean@gmail.com. Please include your name, affiliation, contact information, and 200-300 word description of your proposed topic.

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CFP: Games that We Play, ATHE 2016

Posted By Jessie Glover, Otterbein University, Thursday, October 15, 2015

This is a call for workshop presentation submissions for the ATHE 2016 conference in Chicago, Illinois. Games That We Play is a  workshop-style game exploration and discussion sponsored by the Theatre and Social Change Focus (TASC) Group. Please send a 250 word maximum description of a game or exercise you'd like to lead that includes a brief discussion of the ideological/theoretical underpinnings and practical uses of the exercises in your work. Three (3) workshop presenters will be chosen by Jessie Glover and Kellyn Johnson (session coordinators).


Criteria:

Exercise can be easily taught and explained  to ATHE participants within 20 minutes.

Exercise has a clear connection to conference theme: “Bodies at Work: Performance, Labor, and ATHE at 30”

Presenters will be expected to bring one-page handouts for workshop participants detailing the game or exercise and its expected outcomes.


Please contact Jessie Glover (jglover@otterbein.edu) with your submissions no later than 28 October 2015. Contact Jessie also if you are interested in participating as a co-coordinator or a facilitator in 2016 or at future ATHE conferences.

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ATHE 2016 Panel CFP

Posted By Nancy Taylor Porter, Illinois College, Tuesday, October 13, 2015
Updated: Thursday, October 15, 2015

I am hoping to put together a panel that focuses either on theatre and social change in the Middle East or other politically oppressive international regions, or perhaps a panel focusing on Boal. Below is my current proposal. Please send along proposals you think would fit in this panel and or contact me (via this site or at ntporter@mail.ic.edu) with questions. Thanks!

"Theatre As Artivism in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict" examines the practices of Combatants for Peace's Tel Aviv/Tul Karem Theatre Troupe, which utilizes a variety of Boal's techniques as well as staging direct action at military checkpoints dividing Israeli- and Palestinian-controlled territories. Their joint work as former Israeli soldiers and Palestinian combatants who have decided to lay down their arms evokes personal transformation and liberation that become a springboard for examining and resisting larger social, economic, and political structures perpetuating injustice. Because this region is so sharply divided in terms of ethnicity and geography, their practices — which traverse national, spatial, and racial boundaries in both casting choices and protest strategies — have profound ideological and material implications. They exhibit non-violent bodies performing in ways that significantly challenge the status quo and often reveal the systemic oppression of the occupation. By modeling cooperation among themselves through theatre in addition to enacting peaceful but provocative resistance to Israeli law, these citizen artists strive to make Israel/Palestine a genuine and more harmonious democracy.

 

(25-word description) This paper examines the practices of an Israeli/Palestinian theatre troupe in Israel that uses both Boal and non-violent direct action to challenge the occupation.

 

Note: This paper is based on research and a January 2015 personal interview in Tel Aviv with the troupe's co-founder, Chen Alon.

 

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TASC Call for Papers ATHE 2016

Posted By Annalisa Dias-Mandoly, DC Coalition for Theatre and Social Justice, Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Call For Papers: 

Theatre and Social Change Focus Group (TASC) Sessions

Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) Conference

August 11-14, The Palmer House Hotel

Chicago, IL

 

Submission Deadlines:

Individual papers must be sent by October 25 to Annalisa Dias at diasmandolya@cua.edu (see further information below).

Complete panels must be submitted by November 1 via the ATHE online form at http://www.athe.org.

 

ATHE 2016

Bodies at Work: Performance, Labor, and ATHE at 30 

The Theatre and Social Change Focus Group (TASC) of the Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) invites proposals for next year’s conference to be held in Chicago, IL, at the The Palmer House Hotel.  Our 2016 conference theme, “Bodies at Work: Performance, Labor, and ATHE at 30,” invites participants to consider the relationship between labor and performance, performance and/as work, and our own labor as teachers, scholars, and practitioners of theatre for social change. The conference will address the following key questions:

How does performance help us understand bodies at work, inside and outside theatre? How have theatre and performance historically put bodies to work, for better and for worse? How are bodies disciplined by routines of theatrical labor—or routines of teaching and learning? How can we understand different modes of labor as performances? How do we engage both the pleasure and precarity of bodies at work? How might we choreograph new ways of working?

TASC invites you to consider this invitation not only through the case studies you propose, but also through an even more pronounced engagement with the labor of bodies in performance in theatre history as well as with the labor and practice of writing, researching, and teaching theatre historiography. TASC invites proposals for panels and roundtables, as well as proposals that challenge traditional session formats through performance, workshops, or other “session events.”

As ATHE’s 30th anniversary conference, ATHE 2016 allows us the opportunity to reflect on our own history and work as a focus group. Proposals that engage with TASC’s history within ATHE are also encouraged.

Proposals might engage:

v  The labor and work of the citizen-artist

v  Changing critical methodologies in the field

v  Performative strategies for liberating bodies and minds, both inside and outside the theatre

v  Exploration of issues central to systems of oppression, oppressed peoples, or the politics of defining oppression through performative practice

v  The history of the multiple laboring bodies in theatre and performance

v  Pedagogy and training as critical practice

v  Theories and politics of social change as performative practice, particularly as related to work, worker’s rights, public protest, and democratic systems

We especially invite submissions incorporating approaches that emphasize ‘inter/trans-national and inter/trans-cultural exchanges in performance texts, process, or production.’ TASC remains committed to giving voice to a diversity of methodological approaches and geographical emphases.

Tips for submitting proposals:

1.      Proposals for complete panels (with all presenters assembled) should be submitted directly to ATHE through the website at www.athe.org. The deadline for all proposals is November 1, 2015. Please forward a copy of your proposal to TASC Conference Planner, Annalisa Dias, at diasmandolya@cua.edu. 

2.      If you would like assistance in panel coordination, please use the TASC message board on TASC’s page at athe.org or on our Facebook group (ATHE Theatre History Focus Group), or email individual paper proposals to the conference planner at diasmandolya@cua.edu no later than Sunday, October 25th. Please note, this option does not guarantee submission/acceptance to the conference, which is determined by ATHE and not TASC.

3.      Submissions may be either discipline specific or multidisciplinary. In general, we are interested in panel topics that address the historical role of theatre with a conscious social perspective as well as the research and practice of theatre whose specific focus is the dynamic relationship between performance and society, with special emphasis on cultural analysis and performance praxis which sees itself as an agent for social criticism and/or change. We encourage proposals that include both senior and junior scholars, as well as graduate students. A senior scholar could well serve as a respondent. We also encourage collaborations with other Focus Groups and Committees of ATHE to develop dynamic multidisciplinary sessions. Please see below for specific rules and guidelines for multidisciplinary proposals.

For Theatre and Social Change Specific Proposals  If your session addresses primarily theatre and social change, then choose “Theatre and Social Change” in the first selection box of the online proposal form. When the selection process begins, all TASC-targeted proposals will be sent to the TASC conference planner. The TASC Executive Committee will rank the proposals, and the conference committee will use those rankings to make final programming decisions. It is not necessary to contact the conference planner before submitting a TASC proposal, but please do forward a copy of your proposal to the conference planner once you have submitted it (see above, diasmandolya@cua.edu). Also feel free to contact the conference planner if you have any problems or concerns or if you are curious as to whether or not your proposal is appropriate for TASC.

 

For Multi-Disciplinary (MD) Proposals: If your session addresses theatre history but is also appropriate for another Focus Group or Committee, consider THFG as one of your target focus groups. You must select 2 or more targeted Focus Groups or Committees for an MD panel to be considered. To make an MD proposal you must contact the conference planners for each of the targeted Focus Groups/Committees by email before submitting online in order to receive feedback and to make sure the proposals are appropriate for each FG /Committee. If one of your targeted focus groups is not enthusiastic, it is far better to know before submission and perhaps find another FG or committee to increase its chance of being accepted (MD proposals are ranked by each of its affiliated Focus Groups). See www.athe.org for contact information for Focus Group conference planners and Committee chairs.

Special notes for the 2016 Conference:

A. As you assemble proposals for the website, please avoid copying and pasting material from Word to avoid electronic translation errors. Instead, save your document as rich text (.rtf) and copy/paste from Notepad (Windows) or Text Edit (Mac) into the online session proposal form (found at http://www.athe.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=184).

B. Upon successful completion of a session proposal, the session coordinator should immediately receive a confirmation email from sessions@athe.org.

C. If you plan to use PowerPoint or other projected material, you must request an LCD projector at the time of proposal. While there is a $300 fee, please note that grant requests for technology are strongly encouraged and frequently awarded. For questions about what is included in LCD/Tech packages, please contact ATHE’s Event Planner Erin Barbarskis at erin@athe.org.

D. It will not be possible to request specific days for presentations. If selected, your session could be scheduled on any day of the conference. Session Coordinators should ensure that all participants know that they should be available for all days of the conference.

E. Participants will be limited to a maximum of two presentations, which include delivering a paper, serving on a roundtable, or serving in an equivalent role in a different type of session. There is no limit to the number of sessions that a person can Chair or Coordinate.

Session coordinators should expect to hear whether or not proposals have been accepted or rejected by mid-March 2015.

Questions?  Contact TASC Conference Planner Annalisa Dias at diasmandolya@cua.edu.

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