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CALL FOR APPLICATIONS for ONLINE EDITOR for THEATRE TOPICS and THEATRE JOURNAL

Posted By Martine K. Green-Rogers, SUNY New Paltz, Monday, November 20, 2017

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS for ONLINE EDITOR for THEATRE TOPICS and THEATRE JOURNAL

The editorial staff of Theatre Topics and Theatre Journal is seeking a new Online Editor to serve a three-year term beginning August 2018.

The job entails the administration and editing of the websites for the two journals. https://www.jhuptheatre.org/

For Theatre Topics, this includes soliciting and editing peer-reviewed essays, Notes from the Field, and other materials.  For Theatre Journal, this may also include solicitation and editing and includes assisting the TJ Editors and authors with complementary materials for the website. For both journal websites, the Online Editor is responsible for corresponding with authors, planning, formatting, updating, and uploading materials to the website. Experience with Drupal or other website platforms will be helpful.

Theatre Topics is a peer-reviewed journal that publishes articles and essays exploring subjects at the intersection of theory and practice. Topics is published three times a year. 

Theatre Journal is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal featuring contemporary and historical studies and theoretical inquiries that analyze theatre and performance.

Given the range spanned by articles appearing in the journals, there is no restriction on the editor’s own area of expertise.

To apply, please email: 1) a current CV, 2) a cover letter noting qualifications and a vision for the journal websites; and 3) the names and contact information for two recommenders to: Soyica Colbert, ATHE Vice President for Research and Publications, at sdc71@georgetown.edu . Complete applications are due by December 15, 2017.

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REMINDER: PROPOSALS DUE NOVEMBER 1ST

Posted By Martine K. Green-Rogers, SUNY New Paltz, Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Hello Everyone, 

This is a reminder that the proposals for ATHE’s 32nd Annual Conference in Boston, MA, August 1 - 5, 2018 are due by November 1st (8 days away!).  The conference theme is Theatres of Revolution: Performance, Pedagogy, and Protest.

Please use the brief guidelines and linked proposal forms here to apply by November 1, 2017 for:

  • Single Focus Group (FG) Concurrent Sessions
  • Multidisciplinary (MD) Concurrent Sessions (two sponsoring Focus Groups)
  • ATHE Committee Meetings
  • Pre-conference Events
  • ATHE Grants (including passes)

As a reminder, proposals will be reviewed and ranked by the Focus Group you indicate as a sponsor. If you are submitting a MD Session, please contact all of the Focus Group Reps that you want to co-sponsor the panel before submitting! A listing of all of the Focus Group Reps can be found here.  

Applications for ATHE Grants—Sessions (Passes, AV, Other), Debut Panel (Award, AV), and Pre-Conference—can be found at the end of the related proposal forms. 

For more detailed information please consult the Proposal FAQs and Grant FAQs. If you have any remaining questions, please contact me at greenm@newpaltz.edu.

I hope to see your faces at the conference next summer in Boston.

Best,

Martine Kei Green-Rogers

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Directing Focus Group Roundtable Is Looking For Dramaturgs

Posted By Martine K. Green-Rogers, SUNY New Paltz, Thursday, October 5, 2017

Hello Everyone,

Christina Barrigan is interested in putting together a roundtable with directors, designers, and dramaturgs about cultural appropriation on stage, particularly in academia. Anyone interested in participating in this roundtable should get in touch with Christina at christina.barrigan@cwu.edu.

Best,

Martine

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Submit Your Proposals for ATHE 2018

Posted By Martine K. Green-Rogers, SUNY New Paltz, Sunday, October 1, 2017
Updated: Sunday, October 1, 2017

Hello Everyone, 

This is a reminder that the proposals for ATHE’s 32nd Annual Conference in Boston, MA, August 1 - 5, 2018 are due by November 1st.  The conference theme is Theatres of Revolution: Performance, Pedagogy, and Protest. A link to the full theme statement can be found here

Please use the brief guidelines and linked proposal forms here to apply by November 1, 2017 for:

  • Single Focus Group (FG) Concurrent Sessions
  • Multidisciplinary (MD) Concurrent Sessions (two sponsoring Focus Groups)
  • ATHE Committee Meetings
  • Pre-conference Events
  • ATHE Grants (including passes)

As a reminder, proposals will be reviewed and ranked by the Focus Group you indicate as a sponsor. If you are submitting a MD Session, please contact all of the Focus Group Reps that you want to co-sponsor the panel before submitting! A listing of all of the Focus Group Reps can be found here.  

Applications for ATHE Grants—Sessions (Passes, AV, Other), Debut Panel (Award, AV), and Pre-Conference—can be found at the end of the related proposal forms. 

For more detailed information please consult the Proposal FAQs and Grant FAQs. If you have any remaining questions, please contact me at greenm@newpaltz.edu.

I hope to see your faces at the conference next summer in Boston.

Best,

Martine Kei Green-Rogers

 

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ATHE 2017 - Dramaturgies of the Las Vegas Experience Panel Recap

Posted By LaRonika Thomas, University of Maryland, College Park, Tuesday, September 26, 2017

This panel offered a buffet-style analysis of several Las Vegas attractions. Dan Smith explored Paris Las Vegas by discussing how this casino hotel provides a romantic experience of Paris through a pastiche of Paris architecture, while invoking the libertine aesthetics of Las Vegas. Sean Bartley discussed New York-New York as a metonym for New York City, noting the casino’s status as an impromptu memorial after 9/11 and the accidental choice of the Las Vegas version of the Statue of Liberty for a U.S. postage stamp. Quill Camp viewed the Fremont Street experience through the lens of Walter Benjamin, proposing it as a contemporary version of the Paris Arcades. LaRonika Thomas took a macrohistorical approach, exploring the relationship between water and labor in Las Vegas via Hoover Dam and the Venetian. She pointed out that the growth of Las Vegas due to Hoover Dam brought in workers whose preferred entertainment consisted of gambling and showgirls, and that these entertainments have become the economic drivers of the city. Karen Jean Martinson’s presentation on the Neon Museum and Boneyard focused on questions of desire and the playful curatorial strategies of this attraction’s guided tour. Ann Folino White examined Circus Circus as a relic of a bygone era, critiquing its status as a family-friendly casino.

 

A lively discussion raised various points of comparison, from the spirit of play to the specter of obsolescence. Because each of the presentations focused on sites of inquiry that were easily recognizable tourist destinations, audience members held common ground with the presenters, many prefacing their comments and questions with observations culled from their own engagements with these and other Las Vegas sites. In this, the panel modelled a key function of dramaturgical practice. Dramaturgs conduct rigorous research and analysis, contextualizing theatrical texts theoretically, politically, culturally, and historically. They then bridge this research to their various audiences (through actor’s packets, dramaturgical essays, lobby displays, etc.), crafting a shared knowledge base that raises the level of discourse for all. By turning their well-trained eyes to the sites of Las Vegas, the dramaturgs of this panel combined intellectual and experiential approaches to Las Vegas attractions to engender a rich dialogue with the audience, built upon the theoretical frameworks they provided. 

 Attached Thumbnails:

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ATHE Proposals Due 11/1

Posted By Martine K. Green-Rogers, SUNY New Paltz, Tuesday, September 5, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, September 5, 2017
Theatres of Revolution: Performance, Pedagogy, and Protest 

The 2018 ATHE Conference focusses on revolution, resistance, and protest, and the multiple ways these ideas—and the actions that spring from them—impact theatre in higher education. Drawing on the city of Boston for its historical significance in the American Revolution, and as a site of both academic excellence and artistic innovation, we aim to explore revolutions at the multiple intersections of politics, theatre education, and professional practice. 

Revolution and resistance are tools employed to combat injustice and inequality. However, these tools can be used to effect change in any direction, to create more open and equitable societies, or less. In the 2016 US presidential election and its wake, and heading into 2018 midterm elections, the concept of revolution has been used by both left and right. We will consider various meanings of revolution, in scholarship and performance as well as in our work as educators with students in the classroom, rehearsal hall, and in the larger context of college campuses. 
 
 
 
The conference theme invites examination of ways in which electoral representation resonates with theory and practice in theatre-making: How does representation in politics relate to equitable and fair casting and employment practices? How do changing practices require revolutions in production methods and pedagogies? How might theatre scholarship serve a meaningful public function, engaging with performances – both artistic and civic – that surround us? How might we create art that is aesthetically revolutionary and that activates audiences to make lasting social change? 

Boston’s history allows us to consider performance and revolution in uniquely complicated ways. Events of the American Revolution are memorialized throughout the city in museums and public monuments, many involving performed reenactments. The site of the Boston Tea Party, a protest by white men who masqueraded as Native Americans to resist “taxation without representation” by the British, is marked by a museum only a short distance from the conference hotel. However, other revolutions remain unmarked, such as the systematic and violent dispossession of the Wampanoag, Nipmuc, Massachusett and other nations of the Dawnland by European colonists. In contemporary US politics, the Tea Party has itself become a kind of costume for protest. Groups claiming its ethos arguably play with tropes of revolution alongside those of racial superiority, misogyny, and nativism. Consideration of how contemporary and historical enactments of US foundational stories perform race and gender, as well as erasure of the land’s history before colonization, raises complex questions concerning representation and revolution in this context. These questions resonate in turn with debates prompted by popular theatrical productions like Hamilton, which not only evidences revolutions in storytelling and casting practices, but famously inspired a twitter war between artists and politicians about the role of theatre as “safe space” or platform for protest. 

We see questions about safe space and protest rising on college campuses: demonstrations and counter-demonstrations by right and left, changing policies regarding academic freedom, the development of professor watch lists, conceal and carry laws, designation of sanctuary campuses, and the ongoing impact to students especially vulnerable under new policies, including undocumented and transgender students. These concerns intersect with urgent questions over funding for the arts and for higher education, the cost of education, and perpetuation of economic and institutional inequities on racial, ethnic, and gender lines. 

Join us in Boston in 2018 to explore the precarity and potency of theatre in higher education to protest oppression and advance revolutionary change. #athe2018

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Dramaturgs Night Out at ATHE 2017

Posted By LaRonika Thomas, University of Maryland, College Park, Friday, August 4, 2017

Please join us for Dramaturgs Night Out at ATHE 2017, to be held concurrently with ATHE After Dark, on Friday, August 4 in the Gallery Night Club, beginning at 9pm.  Find us inside the event for a special gathering of dramaturgs and the people who love them!  The event requires a ticket at 9pm and then is open to all beginning at 10pm.  Check your app or conference book for more information.

See you tonight!

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Seeking Conference Roommate

Posted By olga p. sanchez saltveit, Department of Theatre Arts, Thursday, July 27, 2017

Dear Friends,

My sincere apologies if this post is inappropriate ~ I didn't see another way to send a message to the group. 

My Planet Hollywood hotel roommate has had to back out (for medical reasons) from her attendance at the ATHE Conference in Las Vegas.

If you are still seeking accommodations please contact me, I am happy to share Thursday, Friday & Saturday nights' lodging.

Thank you,

Olga Sanchez Saltveit...
osanchez@uoregon.edu

Tags:  conference 2017  hotel  Planet Hollywood  share 

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ASTR Working Group

Posted By Martine K. Green-Rogers, SUNY New Paltz, Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Hello All,

I apologize for cross-listings. If you are planning to attend ASTR,  please consider this working group:

About Face: The Material History of Difference in Stage Makeup and Masks

Jane Barnette, University of Kansas
Esther Kim Lee, University of Maryland
Martine Kei Green-Rogers, SUNY New Paltz

The performer’s face is at the root of our perceptions and performances of difference. Extant stage makeup manuals feature tutorials on how to use cosmetics to change one’s appearance, including one’s age, race, and gender (or even species). Partial and full masks provide another way to transform the actor’s face into various others, as a technology of performing difference. This working session explores the use of makeup in the construction and maintenance of difference, broadly conceived. We will consider makeup, including cosmetics, prosthetics, and special effects makeup from both historical and contemporary perspectives. We welcome contributions about the material history of a wide variety of stage makeup, which can extend to include hair and those elements of costume that highlight the face.

This working session explores the use of makeup in the construction and maintenance of difference, broadly conceived. We will consider makeup, including cosmetics, prosthetics, and special effects makeup from both historical and contemporary perspectives. What assumptions about otherness does the use of makeup imply? In what ways does makeup reflect the perception of ordinary and extraordinary, and in what ways does it participate in shaping those perceptions? How, for example, do makeup manuals and product guides draw on and perpetuate social norms of age, race, class, and gender? Participants might address questions related to the following:

What does the material history of stage makeup tell us about how bodies are perceived and represented?
How does the focus on the face within the field of stage makeup (design and technique) contribute to larger conversations about “extraordinary bodies” and freaks?
How do makeup objects (manuals, tools, cosmetic colors and formulations, etc.) reveal users' biases about faces and bodies, and how are those biases materially linked to the cultures of design and production of that particular moment in history?
In this working group, our primary interest is in projects that engage in the material practice of makeup and mask-making. We will also consider papers on fashion/editorial makeup. What does the use of paint and powder conceal and reveal? We are particularly interested in how makeup has been used to transform performers into non-human characters, “freaks,” “ugly ducklings,” and racial Others onstage and in the performance of everyday life. Do these representations presume that the face is in some ways a static object that can be framed by a narrative for the audience, but overlook the considerable technology, artistry, and biases that shape that perception, which starts with facial recognition? Even in repose, through cosmetics the face is always already performing.

Before the conference, participants will share critical reflections (2500 words maximum) via our shared private wiki. Each participant will then pose questions for at least two colleagues from the seminar, with the goal of elucidating the crucial elements of each colleague’s project: its context, its execution, and its potential contribution to the conversation. Following a dialogue occasioned by these questions, each member of the working group will post one artifact (photo of made-up face, technical diagram, mask, video, makeup tool or product, etc.) to the wiki; participants will review all posted artifacts as their final step of preparation. The two hours we share at the conference itself will be our opportunity to share insights about connections and provocations across projects, and to brainstorm the next steps for the participants who want to continue these conversations.

For any specific questions, please contact the working group convenors at aboutfaceastr@gmail.com.

Please note that all submissions must be received formally through the ASTR website here (http://www.astr.org/?page=17_WorkingSessions). The form will allow you to indicate second and third choice working groups if you wish; if you do so, note that there is a space for you to indicate how your work will fit into those groups. The deadline for receipt of working group proposals is 1 June 2017 and we anticipate that participants will be notified of their acceptance no later than 30 June. Please contact the conference organizers at astr2017@astr.org if you have any questions about the process.

Best,

Martine 

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ATHE Dramaturgy Focus Group Survey

Posted By LaRonika Thomas, University of Maryland, College Park, Saturday, May 6, 2017

We are gathering information from members regarding what kinds of communication and information you would like to receive from and about the group.  

 

Please follow the link below to a short survey regarding communications, as well as voting to ratify our by-laws.  

 

 

You can find the by-laws for your review here:

 

http://www.athe.org/blogpost/1090154/258482/Dramaturgy-Focus-Group-By-Laws

 

 

The survey is available here:

 

https://goo.gl/forms/iiCnAW7bZrSIQ8Gn1

 

 

Please fill out the survey by June 15th.

 

 

Email LaRonika Thomas at laronika@umd.edu if you have any questions or concerns.

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