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CFP: ATHE 2017 Roundtable

Posted By Karen J. Martinson, Chicago State University, Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Apologies for cross-postings.

We are currently seeking participants, particularly scholars of color, to contribute to our ATHE Roundtable discussion. Interested participants should send a presentation title, brief abstract (250 words or less), and short bio/contact information to Karen Jean Martinson (misskarenjean@gmail.com) by Sunday, October 30. 

 Radical Inclusion: Tactics for Fostering Dynamic, Productive Learning Spaces for Discussing Race

This roundtable discussion explores the insights gleaned and the challenges encountered in teaching the sensitive subject of race and racial oppression in different institutional configurations. 

Black Lives Matter. Police brutality. Hamilton. Donald Trump. Over the past few years, we have seen spectacle, haunted as it is by the spectre of race, harnessed as a force for social change as well as an agent for social devolution. Amidst these contradictions, the only thing that seems clear is the fact that we have yet to address our national history of racial oppression. As theatre educators, we are uniquely suited to leading this conversation and for staging performances that can reimagine what diversity means and how a diverse society can flourish. ATHE has long been an incubator for such vital discussions. Notes President Patricia Ybarra in her 2015 Message to the Membership, “The push to radical inclusion will be a long road and one that will not progress evenly forward. At the end of the day, however, I do believe in institutions and more specifically, in productive, painful and often slow and frustrating institutional change.” This roundtable seeks to add to that slow progress, looking at how institutional setting impacts the teaching of the sensitive subject of race. How do the conversations change when the instructor’s identity markers align with or diverge from the dominant demographic of the classroom? How does privilege – racial, gender, economic – complicate the way our instruction can be crafted and is received? We hope to share tactics for fostering dynamic, productive learning spaces.

 

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